Elsewhere…

Actually, we wanted to go elsewhere but it was not open and then, we tried another place but we were too early – it was still closed…so we decided to go here instead where the lady at this stall…

YTF stall

…sells very nice yong tow foo. For the uninitiated, yong tow foo is fish balls and all kinds of things like lady’s fingers, brinjal, bitter gourd, chili…all stuffed with the fish paste and of course, whether it is good or not depends on how good the own handmade fish balls/paste are/is. These are served in clear soup (RM9.00)…

YTF

…with tang hoon (glass noodles), green veg and a bit of seaweed. They do serve the dry version elsewhere like the ones here or here or here but I’m not really a fan of that – I love clear soup!

I counted and there were 13 items altogether, excluding the aforementioned extras so I must say that it is not expensive as I hear they’re selling at RM1.00-1.50 or more per item in towns and cities in the peninsula. The only thing here is that the lady sells the yong tow foo in sets – you cannot get to choose what you want and this is the most expensive set – Set 4. There are cheaper ones but of course, you do not get so many things in your bowl.

I only know of one other place selling the same thing…but I did not think it was any good so we’ve never gone back there again. This one at the coffee shop named Sing Long is in the commercial area behind the Rejang Medical Centre across the road from the nursing college and I would say it is comparable to those more expensive ones I had elsewhere…and the chili dip was so very nice I’d give it a double thumbs up!

My missus had the kampua noodles (RM2.50), puak lak (tossed in chili sauce)…

KM, PL

…from another stall and I did try a bit and I would say it was pretty good.

I noticed that they also sell chicken claws (Eyewwwww!!!! No, thank you!) and our local Sibu-style sio bee/siew mai (70 sen each)…

SB

…and I ordered 3 to try. They certainly looked good and they tasted good too and the best part is that they’re cheaper than most other places in town – at the dim sum places around here, 3 of those meat dumplings would be around RM3.50 or more and some are not even that good.

All in all, we enjoyed what we had and this certainly is a place worth dropping by if you’re looking for a bite to eat.

Advertisements

Author: suituapui

Ancient relic but very young at heart. Enjoys food and cooking...and travelling and being with friends.

27 thoughts on “Elsewhere…”

  1. the ytf looks pretty good … fresh and hearty. ooh, when i was a kid, i was disgusted by chicken claws, but now i try to order them whenever they’re available. love the squishy texture! heheh πŸ˜€

    Ahhhhh!!!! All that collagen! I guess that’s what’s keeping you looking so young, eh? LOL!!! πŸ˜€

  2. That kampua after puak, look like kolok mee. Heheh.

    I love Yong tau Hu too.

    Go and try this one – it’s nice, take my word for it. Ya…kolo mee with the char siew oil, all red in colour.

  3. Is it the chili sauce in the kampua noodles , that makes the meat on the outside that reddish/orange color? Is the meat pork, that’s what it looks like (too me anyways.)

    I had to giggle at the chicken claws. Years ago, my mother told me when she was young that they were so poor that they had to eat every part of the chicken, including the claws. Fast forward until today, my parents owned the land where my father was a sharecropper. A few of her brothers have purchased land in the surrounding that land too. They worked hard and in the end, it paid off.

    Chicken claws are a delicacy here, the favourite of many – and some believe the collagen in them keeps them looking young but no, thank you…somehow, I just can’t get rid of the image of what they’ve been stepping on. Muahahahahaha!!!!! πŸ˜€

    Yup, the chili made the noodles red but no, it had nothing to do with the meat…and yes, that was pork. Usually, they boil the meat in very diluted char siew (Chinese BBQ meat) sauce or whatever to give it a light tint of reddish orange. This one’s a bit too red for comfort so I suspect they used artificial colouring. 😦

    1. That should have been…. Fast forward until today, my parents owned the land where my grandfatherwas a sharecropper.

      Ahh ok… thanks for letting me know how the meat acquires that color.

      Welcome. Wow!!! Things sure work out well for your family, eh? That’s good! Best investment these days – property and land.

  4. The kampua looks very good. The reddish color reminds me of Penang Cafe or rather Antarctic Cold Storage kampua.

    Ya…it certainly looks like it. Haiyar!!! A friend went to Kanowit and tapao-ed for me…and when they called, I was on my way to Selangau so I did not get to eat it in the end. Sobsssss!!!!!

    1. Well, probably not so nice tapaoed. Soggy and all that. We’ll have to go again next July. Missed going there this time.

      I guess this means you’re not coming home this December/January then? 😦

      1. Coming back late Dec and not staying long enough to rent a car or go out of town. Already counting the days.

        I’ll be around, available anytime – just call me! πŸ˜‰

  5. You are right about the price, its Rm 1 to Rm 1.50 per item for yong tau foo here in Penang, but i like fish balls a lot, i’ll avoid those deep fried items but those normal ones yes, any dipping sauce to go with in Sibu? Just sweet sauce and chili sauce?

    Yes, I love the dip…so very very nice, not just chili or sweet sauce, their own. Too lazy to get up or I would have gone and ask for more. Hehehehehe!!!!

  6. Love the YTF & siew mai. Chicken claws, yummy!!!!…I like it too. You don’t know what you are missing, Arthur.

    Never mind, that…I don’t mind missing. Hehehehehehe!!!!

  7. I like the dry yong tau foo. My favorite would be the brinjal, ladies fingers and bitter gourd. And the chilli sauce must be good πŸ™‚

    The fish paste too. Will make a world of difference, whether it is good or not so good – like the other place we went to, never again.

  8. Cheap and nice food are difficult to get nowadays… once you have found it, you must spread the good news! Then one day, you will notice their prices have gone higher… hahaha…
    Yes, the food there looks really good!.. Drooling now!!

    It has gone up higher, used to be RM8.00 or was it RM8.50? Still cheap though… If too expensive, just don’t eat lor…go elsewhere or cook one’s own. No need to be so pessimistic. Life is too short for such negativity, just be happy and praise God for whatever little blessings that come our way, be thankful.

  9. The kampua noodles looks like wanton noodles for me!!! =]

    Good grief! You sure need glasses! Where’s the black sauce? Where’s the green veg? And just from the look of it, one can easily tell that the size and texture of the noodles are different, no need to say anything about the taste. You sure don’t know your wanton noodles, it seems.

  10. Yong tao foo looks ok, but the kampua noodles looks like our ‘wan tan mee’ here, something common so I don’t think I wanna try that first, haha xD

    Oh dear! Another one who needs glasses. You might as well say that spaghetti and wanton mee are the same too – they’re all noodles, aren’t they? Ask the people who have been here and tried…and ask them why I have to tapao for them everytime I go over. I’ve seen people blogging about the Sitiawan kampua – theirs do look like wanton mee, dunno about the taste. Even their kompia looks completely different from ours.

    If I were you, I’d give the yong tow too a miss – I am very sure you have nice ones there too, though maybe a bit more expensive.

  11. Wow this looks yummy! I love yong tao foo can’t find a good one here

    In Penang? We had very good ones at Red Garden, Penang Road…but nothing less than RM10…sometime ago, dunno now. 😦

  12. Wah! The Siew Mai is not cheap and priced like in KL. Now I start to believe that some food stuffs are expensive in Sibu and Kuching as what Huai Bin said before. No wonder the folks there are mostly wealthy.

    KL? That price? You’re sure or not. You’ve got to be kidding! They sell 3 in a basket at those dim sum places – how much a basket? RM4.50, at least, I think…so RM1.50 each…and these are only 70 sen. Not cheap, you say? There are others here that are 80 sen and RM1.00…and some expensive ones, RM1.50 each – no, thank you. They’re not that nice…so don’t ever dream of me ever buying from those people. I can safely say that it is a lot cheaper here than in KL or in Kuching – quality, of course, is another story altogether if we’re talking about the same things – available across the board.

  13. I’m not a huge fan of yong tau foo or the mixed soup in kampua places. I’ll rather have pig liver soup! πŸ™‚

    I do miss the kampua a lot though! I *will* eat the soup you always order if there’s kampua to go with it. Haha!

    Oooo…pig liver! Haven’t had that for a while now…and I love it! You think I should take the chance…and risk a gout attack? Maybe I would… πŸ˜‰ Muahahahaha!!!!

  14. I love YTF…but kinda mahal to eat in KL. RM1 per piece are small pieces.

    Yup, even in Penang…a few years ago. I felt the pinch but what to do, my girl loves it and wanted that then…so I just paid. It was ok, I guess since we cannot get it so easily here so we would not be eating it all the time.

  15. Hmmm, what is the difference between Kolo Mee and Kampua? I still can’t really differentiate it if they put in a bowl! I know slight difference with the types fo noodles and some greens..

    The tastes are completely different…and also the texture of the noodles…and the minced meat & greens, other than the (real) char siew in Hakka kolo mee (Teochew’s has the innards – all the liver, intestine)…and some kolo mee is red in colour as they add the char siew oil to it.

    Kampua is very very simple – but the special noodles (not as firm as any other – only available here and that is why people who sell kampua elsewhere and try to pass it off as the real thing always fail miserably) must be cooked perfectly – not hard and not soggy…tossed in lard that has been used to fry sliced shallots, with local light soy sauce and msg and chopped spring onions and the aforementioned fried shallots…with a few slices of boiled meat slices on top (usually coloured red). Like all Foochow cuisine, the beauty is in the simplicity – so simple and yet, so nice and you try it once, you would want it again and again and again…

    P.S. Thanks for dropping by. Will link you in my blogroll.

    P.P.S. Hey, you’re originally from Kuching! Then, you would know kolo mee very well. VERY nice ones at that shop in the one of those blocks opposite your former school along Green Road. πŸ˜‰

All opinions expressed in my blog are solely my own, that is my prerogative - you may or may not agree, that is yours. To each his/her own.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s