Essence…

In our childhood days, we were made to take all sorts of things. There was the milky white Scott’s Emulsion with the picture of a fisherman and a HUGE fish as big as him on his back. Then, there was the horrible Waterbury’s Compound that tasted like rusty metal.

Come examination time, my mum would wake us up at the break of dawn to get us to do our last-minute revision. She would open a bottle of Brand’s Essence of Chicken and divide it into two, add hot water and make my brother and I drink all of it. They seemed to believe that it was good for the brain and would make the children smart and besides, it would also energise anyone who drank it.

I actually liked it a lot so on some days, I would “help myself” to a bottle from the ones in the pantry to drink! If my mum noticed the missing bottles at the time, she never said anything. LOL!!!

We never drank it anymore once we were no longer in school. People would give my dad boxes and boxes on special occasions, birthdays and for whatever reason and on days when he thought he felt lethargic, he would take a bottle to drink and dunno whether it was all psychological or what but he would feel better after that.

All these years, I only bought a box or two for family and friends who were sick or in hospital for some surgery or those who had just given birth. I never had it myself again until that day when my friend, Yan, gave me a box…

…for my birthday and I actually enjoyed it a lot! Of course, I went a bit slow with the six bottles so it did last for a while.

Well, the other day, my doctor said I would need to take more protein, egg white, fish and all those and I thought this essence of chicken would help in some small way, at least. So I went and bought a box of 24…

…the ones with cordyceps. They also have the ones with tangkwei but I did hear that that is great for ladies, not for men. I picked this as I read somewhere that cordyceps are good for the kidneys.

The bottle seems a bit smaller now and these days, it has a plastic cap…

The cap used to be metal/aluminum with a liver red rubber lining.

I would open the cap and stand the bottle in hot boiling water…

…to heat up the contents and then I would drink it straight from the bottle.

The taste of this one with cordyceps needed a bit of getting used to but after the initial sips, I was fine with it. I still feel that I prefer the original though so when I have finished this box, I would just go for that. I can easily buy cordyceps in capsules at the Chinese medical stores, anyway.

She’s so nice…

The other day, Wednesday, was Ash Wednesday which marked the beginning of the season of Lent, a day of fasting and abstinence.

Unfortunately, we did not have any more fish in the freezer. Yes, we still have a lot of the big pek hay (seawater prawns), two packs and one of the giant freshwater prawns or tua thow hay (big headed prawns)/udang galah and around a kilo of the sotong (squid) – I bought two that time and we cooked one already.

However, I went for my blood test the other day – it had been a year already – and thankfully, my blood sugar was under control, my blood pressure was normal but my cholesterol level was shooting through my head. The doctor said that he had to increase the dosage of my medication and because of that, my missus said we would not be eating those crustaceans for a while but fish would be fine.

That was why I made my way to my favourite fish & seafood stall that morning. There were not that many fish but a whole lot of seawater prawns, huge ones! I guess it must be the season – sometimes, you get a lot, at other times, they are so hard to come by.

I bought two or chio/ikan bawal hitam (black pomfret)…

…and the nice lady told me that they had gone into the freezer, not freshly caught from the sea so they would not be so nice for steaming. I told her it was all right – we never steamed this variety, anyway.

That evening, for our buka puasa (breaking of fast) dinner, we just had one of them, fried…

…and ate it just like that. My missus had been cooking quite a lot of sweet and sour, never mind what fish, so I wanted it plain this time around for a change. Yes, it was very good, so nice and sweet, still fresh, never mind that it had gone into the freezer before this. My girl sure enjoyed it!

I was thinking of buying some kembong but the lady only had some ikan jamar, a similar variety of those small fishes, so I bought six of those. The lady did say that kembong is nicer but when I took the jamar home that day, my missus said that this would be good too. She said that being more affordable, my late mother-in-law used to buy that and they did enjoy it a lot. We did not cook those that day though, another day perhaps.

For our vegetable dish, my missus cooked this Japanese cabbage pancake, the okonomiyaki

…with some strips of carrot added. My girl would not eat cabbage cooked the usual way but she would eat it if used to make coleslaw and that day, cooked like this, she ate most of it, believe it or not!

Back at the fish stall, the nice lady insisted on giving me these…

…a bottle of our Fuzhou traditional red wine, unadulterated (no water added)…

…and a bag of the ang chao (红昭)…

…the red lees that is the residual product of fermenting rice and red rice bran to make the red wine.

Ang chao is used for cooking meat, pork or poultry – chicken or duck…

My missus does it really well, exactly like how my late mum used to do it. Those that I have had outside tend to be somewhat watered down and are not so nice. We also use it to marinate a type of fish for deep frying and these days, they are doing that with meat as well…

I told the lady I would not take those from her unless she let me pay for them but she insisted. She said that a friend asked her to make and she managed to come out with an extra bottle and she would like me to have it. Gosh!!! She really is so nice, so very generous, bless her!

The fish & seafood stall is located to the right of CCL FRESH MINI MARKET against the wall at the end of the block to the right of the Grand Wonderful Hotel (2.309601, 111.845163) along Jalan Pipit, off Jalan Dr Wong Soon Kai. You can also go in via Jalan Pipit from Jalan Pahlawan. Go straight ahead till you reach the place towards the end of that road on your left.

Flea market…

The other day, my hair dryer decided to call it a day.

I just had my bath and I wanted to blow dry my hair so that I would be able to get into bed right away. The old folks used to tell me never to lie down when my hair was wet as I would end up with a headache. Maybe it had something to do with the effect of the “coldness” on one’s head when one’s hair was wet, I wouldn’t know.

Anyway, back to my hair dryer, I heard a crack sound all of a sudden and a horrible burning rubber kind of smell came out of it, probably a short circuit. I quickly switched it off and threw it away.

I cannot remember when or where I bought it. It was that long ago. I am quite sure that I got it at one of those shops in the dark and narrow back lanes and alleyways in between the blocks of shophouses in the town. It was not branded, of course and I bet it did not cost more than RM20.00.

Those shops that resemble the flea markets in some countries never fail to amaze me. They have things hanging on the walls, from the ceiling, on the floor…everywhere! It’s a wonder that they can remember what they have for sale and where they have kept them!!!

No, I did not go into town to get a new hair dryer this time around. I just went to one shop near my house that sells all kinds of electrical appliances and the guy suggested this PHILIPS one…

…for RM50.00!!! Well, what do you expect? It is branded, PHILIPS no less, not some obscure brand from some back lane or alleyway.

Back in my growing up years, if a child fell sick frequently, the parents would say, “Lau eya hoi! Jepun hoi!” (Lousy stock, made in Japan) but look at Japan now! I can say that these days, it is the same with things made in China as well.

When I was in Wellington for my girl’s convocation in 2012, I got her a nice bracelet-like watch…

…but I did not know it was a New Zealand brand so I asked the lady where it was made. “If you look at all the things inside,” she said, “they are all made in China, anyway!

Why, even this PHILIPS hair dryer was made in China…

…too!!! Those people who told me not to buy those things from the flea market shops and places like Supersave, Mr DIY and the 100% Discount shops as they were all made in China and would not last very long can go and eat their words now.

I did not like the colour though…

…so pink! There was a nice silvery grey one, same brand but the guy said it would not be as powerful and there was only a difference of RM2.00 in price. I also saw a nice PANASONIC one and the guy said that those people at the hair salons would use those. “Lu air thow moh boh no tiao, mian eyong anay kui eh!” Translation: Your hair, not even two strands, no need to use such an expensive one! OUCH!!! LOL!!!

So never mind the PINK, I paid for it and took it home.

The last night…

Chap Goh Mei is a Hokkien term that means the 15th night of the New Year. As its name implies, it is celebrated on the 15th, the last night of the Chinese Lunar New Year Festival. In Mandarin, it is called Yuan Xiao Jie (元宵节), which means Prime Night Festival. It is also called the Lantern Festival, which can be confusing to Malaysians seeing how we refer to the Mid-Autumn Festival as the Lantern Festival as well.

That night, the whole family would sit down together to enjoy a lavish dinner, not unlike the Reunion Dinner on Chinese New Year’s Eve, together but for a change, we opted for a steamboat dinner instead and yes, of course, we invited my sister to join us.

These were what we had in the hotpot…

the giant freshwater prawns (tua thow hay/udang galah) that I bought recently, the abalone that the nice lady at my favourite fish & seafood stall gave to me sometime ago, my girl’s favourite seafood tofu cubes and quail eggs, fish maw, fish balls and fried fish cake that my missus made using the fish paste from Jakar and fish slices/fillet that I bought from the aforementioned fish & seafood stall that morning itself.

I wanted to buy the somewhat expensive pek chio/ikan bawal putih (white/silver pomfret) seeing how it was a special occasion (even though we are not entirely fond of that fish) but there was none and I saw some fish that had been filleted so I asked the lady about it. She said it was “white fish”, great for fish soup and fish noodles – I told her we would be having steamboat and she said this would be perfect for that!

True enough, we loved it a lot, very smooth with no fishy smell at all…and no bones. We did not use all that I bought for the steamboat that night so I told my girl that we would use the rest to make our own fish & chips one of these days. I do think that will be nice.

We also had this pork belly, specially sliced thinly for hotpots…

…some Romaine lettuce and mushroom…

…and tang hoon (glass noodles)…

Once it started boiling and after letting it simmer for a while…

…we started to dig in…

Although it may not be as labour intensive as having to cook all the dishes one by one, it is not that easy getting everything ready for a steamboat dinner. My missus started off with the stock and that entailed boiling a lot of pork bones and simmering the soup to get the flavour out. She also added the water used to cook the fish balls and fish cakes (before frying them lightly) and after all that simmering when it had started boiling, you can imagine how very nice the soup was, so very sweet!

While major activities during Chap Goh Meh for people in China include eating tangyuan (glutinous rice balls) over a grand meal, Chap Goh Mei is the last day that families can toss yee sang together, a symbol of all things auspicious. Of course, we did not have yee sang – that is not the usual traditional practice here in this Foochow town and this was the first time I saw anything about eating tang yuan during Chap Goh Meh. I thought we would only do that once a year during the Dongzhi or Winter Solstice Festival around December.

My sister also saw this on social media so she went and bought these matcha durian ice cream mochi (from Walls)…

…for our dessert, in place of the tang yuan. Yes, it was very nice, very generous with the durian inside but to me, it was very sweet. You will not see me rushing to the shops for more, not when I am on a low-sugar diet.

Another new thing that I’ve learnt this year is how the Peranakan community would eat pengat once a year on Chap Goh Meh. For the uninitiated, you can watch this Youtube video to find out all about it. I didn’t know that because when I was at the fish & seafood stall that morning, the nice lady gave me some yam and tapioca. She said that her ethnic employees went home during the Chinese New Year break and brought back some for her. She insisted on giving me some and if I had known, I could have gone and bought some sweet potatoes and t’nee koi (kuih bakul) to cook out own pengat to eat. Ah well! Next year, perhaps!

Don’t stop…

People always say that if, at first, you don’t succeed, try and try again! Well, this is another attempt at taking photos using my smartphone and uploading them onto Facebook and taking them from there.

When I shared my post on Facebook that day, there were a lot of helpful people offering their suggestions. I have not tried Telegram but yes, I did try Google Pics and one suggested getting something to connect the smartphone to the PC and everything can be transferred both ways – right now, I’ve yet to go and look for it in the shops.

I am also trying to improve my phototaking – there seems to be a lot of this and that but I’ve yet to figure out what they are and what I can do with them.

That morning, I took this shot of my bun, cut into halves…

…before putting it in the oven to toast till nice and crusty.

After a while, I took it out to turn it over so as to toast the other side. In the meantime, I put a bit of butter to let it melt over the bun in the hot oven…

I grilled three slices of bacon on my lightly-greased non-stick pan and once done, I placed a slice on top of the bottom half of the bun, followed by a slice of cheese on top of it and two more slices of the bacon…

My girl’s cherry tomatoes from our garden, thinly sliced, followed…

…and lastly, some Romaine lettuce…

…for a bit of green.

There you have it, my bacon sandwich bun…

…and this was the cross-section to let you have a glimpse at what it looked like inside…

So what do you think of the photographs, folks? Straight from the smartphone camera to Facebook, saved from there into My Pictures and uploaded onto Flickr and from there to here – no editing, other than a bit of trimming, top and bottom. Do you prefer my photographs before? Do let me know in your comments below if you think I should go back to my digital camera.

Any relevant suggestions and constructive criticisms are most welcome. Thank you.

I don’t know what to do…

People kept nagging me about getting a smartphone but no, I stayed loyal to my antique NOKIA 3310…

…all this while but earlier this year, DIGI announced that they would switch to 4G here so I would only be able to make calls and send smses (via 2G) unless I get a new phone that is more canggih.

I decided to stick to the aforementioned phone since it is still good for keeping in contact with family and friends. However, in the meantime, I went and got myself a smartphone, no, not the impressive expensive ones in the RM2,000 and above range, but one that cost around RM500.00 only. Of course, all this while, I had been learning how to use it (and progress was pretty slow, this old man) and one of the things I would want to do was to take photographs with it.

They kept saying that if I had a smartphone, I would be able to take photographs with it, no need to drag along a digicam everytime everywhere I went. Well, I’ve seen people taking photographs in dim conditions and their snapshots turned out pretty good unlike the ones I took with my digital camera.

This was the one I took in my kitchen with my smartphone…

…under the LED light in the early morning before the sun rose and this was the snapshot of the same kampung fried rice that my missus cooked taken using my digicam….

What do you think? Which of the two is nicer?

I do not think the photographs are a whole lot different – both would be good enough for my purpose which is to use in my blog but the thing is I don’t know what to do after taking them using the smartphone. With my digicam, I have a cable to attach it to my PC and transfer all the snapshots into MY PICTURES and I could take it from there.

I tried attaching a similar cable (from the charger) to my smartphone and my PC and yes, things started happening but I did not see anything that would enable me to do what I wanted to do. I went and googled and got this but I could not make head or tail out of it.

Right now, the only thing I can do is to post the photographs on Facebook, set to ONLY ME, and take them from there. Does anybody know of an easier or better way? Do let me know, if you do. Thanks.

That’s what I want…

I saw my blogger-friend’s post on her bak kua (barbecued pork slices) sandwiches and they sure looked good. “That’s what I want!” I thought to myself.

Unfortunately, she used some sourdough bagels and the closest thing to that that we have here would be our Foochow kompia (2 for RM1.00)…

We had imported bagels at a supermarket here once…

…and I had bagels…

…when I was in Wellington, New Zealand sometime ago and also at a café …

…here but at the end of the day, to me, bagels are just a kind of bread and what makes them nice would be what you have in between and in this case, we have our bak kua.

Of course, to make a sandwich using a kompia, I would have to cut a slit in it and that was what I was doing in the above photograph after which I applied a bit of butter…

…to the base.

Next, I put in the bak kua

– the butter should help keep it from slipping off the kompia.

After that, I arranged some thinly-sliced cherry tomatoes (from our garden) on the bak kua

I did not have to worry about the slices as I would be putting in the cheese…

…next and once melted in the oven…

…after I had toasted my bak kua sandwich, that would keep the tomatoes well “glued” down.

Lastly, I added a bit of Romaine lettuce…

…for a bit of green and my bak kua sandwich was ready for the eating!

Yes, it was very nice…

…but it was rather small. I would have to make quite a few to be able to eat to my heart’s content.

I could use our chu nu miang (3 for RM1.00)…

…instead but the taste and the texture are completely different. This one is soft and cushiony, less fragrant and slightly sweet unlike the kompia but I do know that our very own Sibu franchise…

…makes use of these to make their burgers at their outlets.

I did try making my own once and it did turn out pretty well…

I guess this would be nice for a bak kua sandwich too.

All by ourselves…

It’s Chinese New Year’s Eve today – the Year of the Tiger, not that we are looking forward to it. We are keeping it low key and are celebrating it all by ourselves, just to keep the tradition and preserve our heritage more than anything else.

For one thing, I was quite pissed off by the authorities concerned in the state and the rules and regulations laid down as to how we should celebrate the festival – they will say one thing one day and something else the very next day. The people at national level sure made a mess that day with regard to the celebration of Thaipusam.

First, they said no lion dances would be allowed, plus all the restrictions for the reunion dinner and house visiting. Incidentally, they said open houses are not allowed but house visiting is permitted for family members only, the number depending on the size of the house, for just one day and then they changed it to two!. Pray, tell me, what is the difference between an open house and house visiting?

Eventually, they said lion dances are allowed, dunno if they said anything about dragon dances or not. You must put up the QR code at your door and people coming to your house must scan to check in…bla…bla…bla!!! Never mind! Say what you want, do what you want! We shall just do away with everything, no need for all that hassle, such a nuisance!!!

My missus did not make any cakes this year nor are we going to buy any since we are not having an open house plus I am on a low sugar diet. Having said that, this came as a surprise yesterday when my girl’s coursemate and friend dropped these kek lapis (layer cakes)…

…off at our gate for us for Chinese New Year. That was so sweet and thoughtful of him and his missus, the kind and generous gesture is certainly most appreciated indeed, thank you so so much! May God bless them and all their loved ones abundantly in the coming year.

Another surprise followed soon after when we received this kek lapis and a huge pack of muruku

…from my cousin, AhLek and his wife, Saliah who would send us things without fail every year. I heard just the other day that the two of them are in KL right now with their daughter there so I assumed they would not be giving us anything this year. I guess they must have asked their son here in Sibu to buy and send to us, thank you so so so much to them and their loved ones too and may God bless them abundantly as well in the year ahead.

My missus did make these kuih dahlia or kuih semprit

…though but they seem a shade darker this year compared to last year’s, probably because of the low GI brown sugar (we do not have regular sugar in the house anymore) that she used, and these Nestum cookies…

…that I do like a lot. Of course, I have to confine myself to just one or two pieces per day.

This is not fish skin…

– it is actually seaweed wrapped with popiah skin and deep fried. The ladies in the house love it so much – they gave a tub to my sister and she said that she finished it in one sitting, watching some drama on TV.

Every year, my missus would buy cashew nuts and toast them in the oven with butter added for extra fragrance. My brother-in-law likes them a lot so of course, she toasted some again this year…

..to give to him and also to enjoy ourselves.

In the meantime, I went to one of the neighbourhood shops in the next lane and picked up this pack of pistachios…

…or as they are called in Chinese, happy beans/nuts (开心豆/kāi xīn dòu). I do enjoy munching on those and this brand is pretty good, the same brand as the canned corned beef that I always buy – I would buy it every year but goodness gracious me! It is now RM50.00 a pack. *faints*

Of course I did buy myself some bak kua (barbecued meat slices) to enjoy. I bought the nice one from Kuching that day but after that, I went for the ones from Loong Kee which, needless to say, did not come cheap but never mind! After all, it’s just once a year.

In the meantime, my girl’s ex-colleague from her former school in the jungle gave her two packs of these mala-flavoured ones…

…thank you so much to her. They are probably locally-made and yes, I do think they are pretty good, slightly spicy and more inclined towards salty, not so sweet.

We still have a bottle of the nyonya acar (pickles) that my missus made

…that day but we have finished off all the keropok (prawn/fish crackers) that I fried…

…so my missus went and bought two more packs and fried all of them and kept them in an airtight tin. So far, we’ve been very good – we have not touched them yet. I guess it will be gone soon enough, eventually.

No, I did not bother to do any spring cleaning nor did I hang up any lanterns nor take the trouble to decorate the house, no new clothes, no new bank notes, nothing! As you can see, it is going to be a very quiet Chinese New Year this year.

Don’t look down on me…

We call this fish bak chi‘…

I do not know its name in English or Malay but my missus would buy it quite frequently a long time ago when she used to do her marketing at the central market but ever since the pandemic broke out, we have not set foot on that high risk place so we have not had this for almost two years now.

According to her, in her growing up years, they would eat this fish all the time for the simple reason that it was very cheap and they all enjoyed it – all of them loved it and I must say that I would agree with them. Don’t look down on it because even though it is cheap, it tastes real good and if you fry it a little bit longer till it is more crispy, you can eat most of it, the fins and all, leaving behind only the big bone in the middle. I do enjoy its crispiness and that special taste along with it a lot.

There may be some of those smaller fish like the kembong and all the rest…

…at my favourite fish & seafood stall but my girl does not seem to like those so I would not buy them. That was why when I saw them at the Malay stalls, I would buy one or two…

…for myself to “buang gian” (appease the craving).

She does like bak chi’ to some extent but they are very small and I cannot imagine cleaning them one by one. That was why when I saw some at the aforementioned stall the other day, I asked the nice lady if she could clean it for me and she said that would not be a problem.

I asked for 1 kilo (RM10.00 only) and got 20 of them, so cheap! I expected her to pass them to her helper, a nice young boy, to cut and clean out the insides but no, she did it herself…and I was stunned when I saw how she simply plucked off the heads of each fish violently…and that was it! When I got home, my missus was delighted that I had bought her favourite bak chi’ and when I told her what the lady did, she said that was the way they would do it, no need to cut and clean one by one inside out.

My missus just rinsed all of them well and deep fried them…

– there was enough for the three of us for lunch that day and also for dinner.

Actually, I dropped by the stall that day to see how the lady was doing. I noticed that usually, the stall was not open lately. For one thing, it had been raining a lot and besides, I did see those warnings regarding strong winds and stormy seas so I guess under such conditions, the fishermen could not go out to sea. She seemed to be doing all right, lots of fish that day and I still have my stock of prawns that I bought from her not too long ago, enough to last till after Chinese New Year so I did not want to buy anything else that morning, other than the bak chi’.

I saw her taking out one of the huge storage styrofoam containers and opening it and I was stunned when she put a packet of this…

…in my bag with my fish. “For you, for Chinese New Year!” she said.

Oh dear!!! I thought that was so embarrassing but she insisted and would not take “no” for an answer. Left with no choice, I just said thank you so much and took it home – perhaps, we shall have that for our Chinese New Year’s Eve Reunion dinner, may the Good Lord bless her and all her loved ones abundantly in the year ahead. Gong Xi Fa Cai!

The fish & seafood stall is located to the right of CCL FRESH MINI MARKET against the wall at that end of the block to the right of the Grand Wonderful Hotel (2.309601, 111.845163) along Jalan Pipit, off Jalan Dr Wong Soon Kai (formerly Jalan Pedada).

Out of nowhere…

Over the years, we have had things sprouting out of nowhere in our garden.

There was a noni tree which probably came from a house three doors away – I’ve seen the tree in their garden. It grew very well and was bearing fruits, lots of them. My missus happily plucked them and made enzyme with them and made me drink. Those of you who are familiar with the fruit would know how smelly it is – the enzyme is not much better. Thankfully, the tree was getting to be too big so I got rid of it. Phewww!!!

I had no idea where the avocado tree growing very near the house came from either. My cousin in Kuching sent me a photo of theirs, a couple of years old and it was so big! I quickly got rid of mine but last year when my cousin and the rest of the family were enjoying the fruits of their labour, I wished I had kept my tree. Perhaps I could have moved it away from the house.

I had a few papaya trees but I could jolly well guess that they sprouted out of the seeds that I buried in my garden, together with the skin everytime I peeled one. Unfortunately, they flowered but there was no fruit, not even one so they too eventually faced the axe.

This watermelon plant…

…probably came out of the seeds that I buried as well but the last time we had any was quite sometime ago – it sure took a long time to emerge.

There are a few small fruits growing on the vines at this point in time but the problem is we do not know when exactly is the right time to harvest them…

…and eat. Unlike other fruits that will change colour or become softer, watermelons will remain pretty much the same. I guess we will just wait a bit till they have grown a bit bigger.

My girl planted these cherry tomatoes…

…and the fruits have started to appear. She did eat a few and she said they were very nice, very sweet and crispy. I’ve never seen this variety before – the fruits are oval-shaped…

…not round.

The mum planted these regular ones…

…and they have eaten the fruits too, also sweet and crispy. These must be the Cameron Highlands variety that I used to buy at a supermarket here except that those were very big, much bigger than these. Never mind, as they say, beggars can’t be choosers.

She also planted some chili…

…but I am not getting my hopes up too high. I also planted a lot once and yes, they grew really well and produced a whole lot of chilies. Unfortunately, before they ripened, they would start rotting on the inside and drop off one by one. I think I did get to eat one or two, that was all.

They were very successful with their ladies’ fingers and brinjal and kangkong. My cangkok manis that was struggling to stay alive is thriving really very well under their care and at this point in time, my missus has planted some sweet potato leaves too. I planted a lot at one time…

…but they went out of control and we grew tired of eating it so I got rid of them.

Yes, the prices of vegetables (and most everything else) have been going up and up but no, I still think it is a lot easier to just go and buy. As far as planting one’s own goes, I guess it is very convenient to just go out into the garden to harvest and it is a lot healthier too as we do not use any chemical fertilisers and pesticides. Besides, it can be quite therapeutic, being kind of relaxing and is thus a great way to pass the time plus it is in a way a good form of exercise too.