Stick together…

This award-winning café has called it a day but no, it wasn’t because of COVID-19. It was before the pandemic outbreak when the owner decided that she had had enough. I do not know what they have there now – I did drive past a couple of times and it looked something like a coffee shop with food stalls and what not.

In the meantime, some of the employees are jobless or maybe they are working elsewhere but at such trying times, it is good that there are people finding ways and means to make ends meet. I’ve seen a lot who have set up makeshift stalls at their gates but I’ve yet to stop by any to see what they are selling. One of the former employees is selling shallot oil…

Shallot oil

– I think a bottle like this is RM7.00 or maybe, RM8.00. My sister bought that for me so I do not really know the price.

That is definitely very convenient when one wants to cook one’s own noodles. There is no need to peel and slice shallots to fry for the fragrant oil to use to toss the noodles. Of course, one will not have the nice fried shallots to garnish one’s noodles but I hear the enterprising lady is selling those as well.

And talking about noodles, I came across this Youtube video clip on cooking Foochow red wine mee sua and I was aghast at the sight of how they cooked the mee sua in the chicken soup (1:20). We do not do that here – instead, we cook the noodles, drain well and place it in a bowl and then, we pour the soup over the noodles and serve with a piece of chicken or two. I decided to watch a few more video clips and I saw that most, if not all, of them cooked it that way, in the soup! No wonder the soup of the celebrated mee sua I had at Jalan Alor in KL

Jalan Alor, KL mee sua

…was murky and starchy, not palatable at all, plus the wine was sweet, definitely not something to my liking and no, I did not finish it!

It so happened that I had a packet of mee sua due to expire at the end of the month…

Mee sua expires 31.8.2020

…so I decided to cook it the other morning. I think I bought that during my panic buying when the COVID-19 MCO partial lockdown started in March. It certainly would be a good idea to look through the things you bought then and have not eaten – who knows, some may be due for expiry and should be consumed quickly.

When you boil mee sua, you will need a lot of water so it will not be so salty when served. When my mum cooked it in my younger days, she did it very quickly so that the noodles would not be too soft and because of this, she never added salt to the chicken soup she cooked. She said the salt in the mee sua would make it salty. I like my noodles soft so I would cook it a little bit longer and you can see how the water turns murky and starchy…

Cooking mee sua

…in the process. That will remove the starch in the noodles and the salt as well so you can imagine cooking it in the soup and serving it like that. If you are eating it right away, you can just drain the noodles well and place it in a bowl. Then, you put the soup into the bowl and mix with the noodles thoroughly, loosening the strands so they will not stick together.

If you are not eating it right away, you will find that the noodles will all stick together in a clump and adding the soup to it does not really help. I would drain the noodles and rinse it well and then I would put it in water to get the strands loose and separate them…

Rinse well

Repeat till the water is clear and once I am happy enough, I would drain the noodles well and move on to the next step.

If I am serving the mee sua dry, I would put the noodles back into some hot/boiling water to heat it up – I am sure nobody enjoys cold noodles (though there are those served with ice in some cuisines). After that, I would toss the mee sua after draining it really well with all the ingredients like what I had that day when I cooked the aforementioned pack with Bovril garnished with thinly sliced omelette, chili and spring onion. See how the strands stand out singly, not sticky and all stuck together…

Strands of mee sua

Of course you would not need to “reheat” the noodles if you are having it with piping hot traditional Foochow red wine chicken soup. It will do the job for you.

I sure enjoyed my Bovril mee sua

My Bovril mee sua

…that morning – come to think of it, I have not had it for sometime and that bottle of shallot oil sure came in handy.

Author: suituapui

Ancient relic but very young at heart. Enjoys food and cooking...and travelling and being with friends.

7 thoughts on “Stick together…”

  1. You sure are diligent to cook a delicious dish by processing the Mee suah with so many steps! Good of your sister to support home based sellers by buying the shallot oil. I think yellow wine (Wong chao) is supposed to taste sweet.

    Yes, the wine was sweet, not what I was accustomed to so I did not enjoy it…plus it was so strong that it got me quite tipsy/drunk.

    They were doing this same thing with kolo mee in Kuching in the 70’s, couldn’t recall them doing it with kampua mee – many/most of them do it now. My college mates from Sibu were complaining about kolo mee – so hard, how to eat. Actually it was firm, very QQ…not like Sibu kampua, soft…and soggy/wet, if they overcooked it. It’s the same thing – how to cook mee sua and make sure the strands do not stick together. I always do it as that is the way I like my mee sua.

    I guess we should do what we can to support local businesses and people who need help.

  2. I always heard people talking abt fried mee sua and wonder whether this is the type of mee sua they are using or not. I like mee sua in chicken soup drown with red wine. Your brovil mee sua looks tempting.

    Yes, it’s the same. Lots of speculations when it first appeared like deep-frying the mee sua in oil first. Not true! I’ve tried frying, quite successfully but it was not as nice as I would want it to be, chin chai recipe, everything throw in. Perhaps I’ll give it a try one of these days. Hopefully can come out with a really nice one.
    https://suituapui.wordpress.com/2015/11/16/its-not-impossible/

  3. I don’t add salt in the water when cooking mee suah. There is this mee suah from Sibu. Very good and salty enough. I like it as it is good.

    Hubby bought a bottle of pork lard oil, I have not use it. Yes, shallot oil should come in handy when cook noodle.

    No, of course, you do not add salt to the water when cooking mee sua. There is salt in the noodles – I cook with a lot of water to get rid of the saltiness but I’ve noticed that these days, they are no longer salty – not like in my younger days. My mum would not add salt to the chicken soup for eating with mee sua – she said the noodles already salty.

    So many to choose from but not all are good – some are kind of hoon hoon (the smell of flour). Best to buy the extra thin ones and dry yourself but I am too lazy to do that.

  4. I think food and beverage is one of the hardest industries to be in.

    Especially at a time like this. Things aren’t going to be as good as before so they will just have to think of ways and means to keep themselves afloat. Many will sink, that’s for sure.

All opinions expressed in my blog are solely my own, that is my prerogative - you may or may not agree, that is yours. To each his/her own. For food and other reviews, you may email me at sibutuapui@yahoo.com

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