Fixing a broken heart…

How do you mend a broken heart?

Broken heart

The one that was served that day (RM1.50 per plate) was cracked but I guess if I had pushed it back together again to close the crevices, it would be whole once more but no, I did not bother to do that. LOL!!!

I had their chicken rice once before and I quite enjoyed it so that day, I dropped by there again with my missus to let her have a go at it.

The lady who took our orders spoke only Mandarin and I asked for a platter of char siew (barbecued pork), siew yoke (roast pork) and roast chicken from the roast meat stall…

Mitsu roast meat stall

…but this was what we got (RM13.00)…

Siew yoke & roast chicken

…the very nice siew yoke that was somewhat different from all the rest elsewhere..

Mitsu siew yoke

…and the roast chicken…

Mitsu roast chicken

…but there was no char siew. I did not bother to ask why – I did not feel like going through all that hassle of trying to get her to understand my sprinkling of Mandarin so we just ate what we were served.

There was a sign on the stall, RM6.50 for whatever it was. Yes, the lady went through great lengths to explain what it was but no, we could not make head or tail of what she was rattling on and on about. I just ordered it so I would be able to see what it was…but it never came! Tsk! Tsk!

There was another sign beside that one, also in Mandarin, priced at RM4.00 and yes, I could understand the lady when she said it was their signature dish but I failed to make out the rest of what she said and yes, I ordered that too! It turned out to be a bowl of dumplings, six of them altogether (RM4.00)…

Mitsu dumplings in miso soup

I was quite sure I heard something like shui jiao but no, I did not like the soup they served them in. My missus said it was miso soup and personally, I would much rather have the clear bone stock soup that they serve our pian sip (meat dumplings) in.

My missus quite liked what we had that day – no, I would not say it is the best in town but it is good enough, something one might consider having if one happens to be in the vicinity.

MITSU SHABU SHABU CAFE (2.293215, 111.836281) is located along Lorong Chiew Siik Hiong 1 in the Fortune Commercial Centre, behind the Rejang Medical Centre. It is at the corner opposite Lok Ming Yuen Cafe behind which is Sushi Tie, the Japanese Restaurant.

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Author: suituapui

Ancient relic but very young at heart. Enjoys food and cooking...and travelling and being with friends.

13 thoughts on “Fixing a broken heart…”

  1. Guess it is the language barrier that caused the char siew to go missing. And she did not get it that you wanted to order the RM6.50 dish so it never arrive.

    She did confirm that I wanted the three types of roast meat – maybe, it slipped her mind after the long deliberation over the RM6.50 and RM4.00 items…or the guy at the chopping board did not get her message right.

    As for the RM6.50 one never appearing, I guess she did not get me right – that I wanted both…or she just assumed I wanted one and not the other as I had already ordered quite a lot of two persons. It didn’t really matter – I did check to make sure it was not on the bill.

  2. The name of the cafe sounds like Korean/Japanese, no wonder they serve the dumplings in miso soup. I prefer clear soup too. Siew yok & roast chicken looks equally good.

    Started off as a dim sum place and then the shabu shabu place took over and now it is a combination of both and a whole lot of other things. Doing very well.

    Same here, don’t really see what is so nice about miso soup and a whole lot of those Japanese and Korean stuff that young people are so much into these days. Maybe it’s trendy – not something for old folks like us or our old school taste buds can’t appreciate what they seem to like so much.

  3. It’s a pity you didn’t get the char siu. To me, it’s a necessity with siew yoke.

    The char siew here may not be all that great, some ok ones, that’s all. Can’t compare with the nice ones I had before in KL and elsewhere. Maybe it’s because it’s not really a Foochow thing, more Cantonese.

  4. Crispy roast pork I can eat them all day. Just the crispiness of the skin is so addictive

    I had very nice roast pork at a food court in Auckland, 1st floor at a building near the ferry jetty. I just had the pork…and the guy waved the crackle in the air like a sword to ask if I wanted any. I said no, thank you. 😀

  5. They really served the rice in a heart shape? Woah… those pork… OMG so tempting weih! 😀

    Lots where you are…and I would say, nicer ones too! Especially the char siew.

  6. I just had some roast pork and char siew yesterday in the food court in Lot 10 Hutong on Bukit Bintang. I wonder if you’ve ever visited when you’ve been in KL?

    Yes, I like dropping by there. YTL’s picks from among the best in the city.

  7. Lol. Heart or no heart, the rice must be good and fragrant. Haha.

    Not many people do this heart-shaped rice. Few that I saw are doing the salad chicken rice. Not so for roasted meat stalls. Usually the normal round shape.

    Now, there is also the conical-shaped rice at some Malay or Indonesian places. They use a funnel to get the rice to look like that.

  8. At first when I saw the title, I thought you have a broken heart, hey that is a song title, nice title for a post, hard to get really nice roast pork as sometimes the crispy part (the skin) is too hard

    In Singapore? I would expect to find really nice ones there. We do get very good roast pork here but when it comes to char siew, I had very much nicer ones in KL. I guess it’s Cantonese, not Foochow.

    1. I mean it is a suitable title for your post, because you are featuring a plate of heart shaped rice which seems broken, haha

      Quite a number of broken heart song titles to pick from.

  9. LoL! Yet you still have the heart to dine there. For me, if I can’t speak their language, I’ll just play safe and point to the menu.

    I wonder how the ethnic people manage, the local Dayaks, if they want to eat here. Perhaps they do speak Malay, I wouldn’t know. No English or Hokkien, that’s for sure.

  10. i’m also surprised to see this chinese fare at a place with shabu shabu in its name … i wonder if some other unfamiliar customers might get confused when they walk in, heh 😀

    The name is from the original place of its current owners – they added that to it when they took over. They do have shabu shabu here too, upstairs in air-conditioned comfort…among a whole lot of other things.

  11. The shop name, MITSU SHABU SHABU CAFE sounds interesting. Probably the reason why the dumpling soup is of miso.

    Probably, fusion of shabu shabu and dim sum and everything else. A very wide variety of things available at this place.

All opinions expressed in my blog are solely my own, that is my prerogative - you may or may not agree, that is yours. To each his/her own.

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