I’d come for you…

The last time we dropped by here, I saw somebody eating the Singapore fried Hokkien prawn noodles and I thought it looked very good and I could detect the very nice fragrance too so I made up my mind there and then that I would come again just for this (RM8.00)…

Singapore fried Hokkien prawn noodles

Unfortunately, looking at it more closely, it did not seem as great. There were two rather small udang galah (freshwater prawns)…

Two small prawns

…cut into halves so it looked like there were four. There was no sotong (squid) and the sambal and calamansi lime…

Sambal and lime

…that came with it did not save the day. We used to have a really good one here – the guy was a chef in Singapore before he came back and opened his own stall here but he did not stay long at one place, moving here and there and at one time, he even moved to Ipoh where his wife came from. I have no idea where he is right now and whether he is still in the business.

I used to enjoy it very much when I was in Singapore in 1973/1974 and I sure enjoyed the one that Alfred, my Singapore friend, went through all that trouble to bring all the way for me to enjoy, wrapped in the opeh leaf, the way it should be. This one, of course, came nowhere near and I sure would order something else instead should I happen to be around here again.

My missus loved their Foochow fried noodles during our previous visit and this time around, she decided to try their KL Hokkien mee (RM6.00)…

KL Hokkien mee

…which was not to her liking as she did not like all the pork fat crusts in the dish.

My girl’s sambal bihun (RM4.50)…

Sambal bihun

…was very nice – it had the much coveted wok hei fragrance but I thought it was a little too light on the sambal so anyone who is more into that would find this somewhat disappointing. Looking at it, we thought that was tang hoon (glass noodles), not bihun (rice vermicelli) but we were not too sure and we did not bother to ask to find out.

Of course, since we were there on a Saturday, the popiah (spring roll) stall was open. The lady was nowhere in sight and there was a young boy and a young girl running the stall and doing everything. My guess was they were the lady’s children enlisted by the mum to help out since they would not need to go to school on weekends. What impressed me a lot was how the two seemed so very happy the whole time, smiling away and enjoying what they were doing.

I ordered the dumplings (7 for RM5.00)…

Dumplings

…that I knew my girl would like and I also requested for the very nice popiah (RM2.80 each, 2 for RM5.00)…

Popiah

The lady did appear later and she did stop by our table to say hello…and yes, those were her children. Some people are truly blessed to have such wonderful kids – many these days would not bother to lift a finger to help to do anything and would rather while their time away online on their ipad or smartphone.

Well, we would come back again sometime for the popiah, of course, and the next time around, we’d probably try something else to see if there is anything else here that is worth dropping by for.

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Author: suituapui

Ancient relic but very young at heart. Enjoys food and cooking...and travelling and being with friends.

16 thoughts on “I’d come for you…”

  1. I would go for the dumplings, popiah and sambal bihun. The sambal bihun is just right for me because I prefer it to be light and not heavy on the sambal.

    I am surprised that your wife does not like to eat deep fried pork lard (chu yau zhar) as most people would like to eat them and it is a must for KL Hokkien mee to have them. I don’t like to eat them too.

    The gravy for the Singapore fried Hokkien prawn noodles looks almost milky. For MYR8, I don’t expect the freshwater prawns to be big.

    Of course not! I was wondering where they got these tiny ones though, about the size of your pinky. I would not mind going for these if they are much cheaper – the regular ones are at least RM30 a kg at the wet market. Yes, I was wondering about the milky gravy too. It tasted all right, just not something I would be rushing back for more and nothing like the real thing that I had had before.

    We’re not into pork crusts here unlike over at your side. I noticed that they would render the pork fat for the lard to fry the kway teow and leave all the crusts in it – I know that is an attraction among the locals but I would pick them out one by one and leave them by the side. Same as you, can’t say I’m all that fond of the smell and taste.

  2. I wouldn’t know Singapore Fried Hockkien noodles looks milky like fish head bihun as I have never seen/had it. Say NO to the pork crust in the KL Hockkien mee. To me, Mel’s Sambal bihun is definitely tang hoon as it looks transparent. All in all, I still vote for the sambal bihun.

    Yes, I don’t think it was ever milky like that, the ones that I had before…and me too, not a fan of those pork fat crusts. The sambal bihun was all right, not bad.

  3. I would order mihun, my favourite among the noodle dishes you guys had.

    The popiah look so good and generous.

    Yes, they’re always very generous with the crushed peanut – that’s one thing that makes it really nice.

    Well, the bihun was good…and the Foochow fried noodles that my missus had the last time too. I saw everybody else having their hot plate noodles – maybe I should try that next time.

  4. Singapore Hokkien noodles too “white” and clear for me.. I prefer the Hokkien mee, but from the picture, the noodles look a bit soft and mushy, like can melt in the mouth before even chewing, hehe πŸ˜›
    My favourite would be the dumplings, I can eat 10 pieces, dipped in vinegar+ginger..

    It is supposed to look white and clear, not too sure about the milky gravy. Given a choice between the really good one and KL Hokkien mee, I would go for the Singapore version. I sure like it a lot more.

  5. Popiah is not cheap… I don’t recall seeing any of them during my trip to Kuching and Miri…

    You didn’t? Awwwwww!!!! Dunno about Miri but I do know of three places in Kuching where the popiah is very nice. I did try at one other place but it was somewhat disappointing. I guess that shows, like everything and everywhere else, you would need to know where to do. This one is the only nice one here, different…not the same recipe but it is nice and I would keep going back for more.

  6. Dumpling is my all time favourite…

    Between the two, I prefer the popiah but don’t mind having those as well – my girl enjoys them.

  7. Your Missus can pass me the hokkien mee – cos I love pork lard! The more the merrier πŸ™‚ it looks nice and wet too … These folks know how to make it the way I like it!

    I liked the fact that it was not too wet, not flooded with the gravy. It looked ok, dunno the taste – did not try, just that my missus did not like the crusts. I would leave them all by the side as well.

  8. Your mention of the opeh leaf brought back memories. I haven’t seen one in a long, long time.

    I hear it is coming back. According to my friend from Singapore when he bought me a pack of the noodles wrapped in the leaf, some stalls there are starting to use it again – without it, it just is not the same. Like nasi lemak in a banana leaf plate – that is no replacement for the actual banana leaf, that’s for sure. They might as well use any ol’ plate.

  9. The popiah looks the most attractive of all… the noodles do not look appetizing… yes, the mihun looks like glass noodles and are they purposely cut so finely? Over here, most of the mihun are long and not cut short.. πŸ™‚

    No idea. It is so transparent, bihun usually isn’t.

  10. I love Singapore style Hokkien noodles. I know I get can one that is decent at Mid Valley food court. I also bought the similar taste of instant noodle by Myojo. Quite delicious.

    Mid Valley? I did not see that!!! Gotta look out for it the next time then. Myojo? Will check the ones at the supermarket here that stocks up on that brand. Wouldn’t mind grabbing a pack if it tastes similar.

  11. I like popiahs, dumplings, sambal meehoon and KL fried hokkien mee here. All look so good to me. Yummy!

    Especially the popiah! I would not mind going there again and again for that, very nice!

  12. I like my Singapore Fried Hokkien Noodles slightly wetter but it’s hard to find good ones even here in Singapore.

    So I’ve heard. Same here with our local delights – not the same anymore, most places. Would have to know where to go for the good ones.

  13. The pork crackling is the best part about Hokkien mee! Some places here don’t have it, that’s the subpar ones, all the authentic places will have pork crackling in Hokkien mee.

    Yes, I know. It’s the star attraction. I would pick them out and leave them by the side though. In my younger days, my mum would render her own lard, one big pot of it for all the cooking. I think she gave the crusts to the neighbour for the poultry or whatever they were rearing. We never ate them.

All opinions expressed in my blog are solely my own, that is my prerogative - you may or may not agree, that is yours. To each his/her own.

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