Long gone day…

When I was blogging about the kuih bangkit that day, my regular reader and commentor, Irene, said she also loves kuih sepit, kuih S & lek tau ko and added, “Nowadays, I never see people make lek tau ko. These few are my childhood CNY cookies.” Well, I was positive that they do sell lek tau ko at a bakery in town so I made my way there to have a look and that was why I ended up having the somewhat disappointing kolo mee special at this coffee shop in the next block that morning.

Yes, they had lek tau ko but they were kind of black in colour – probably they did not remove the skin of the green beans when they ground them for the flour to make those. Besides, they were kind of distorted and did not seem to have those very nice shapes that used to appeal to us in the long gone days when we were kids. Somehow or other, it thrilled us to no end to pick an animal and bite its head off and eat it all up. Gee!!! We kids those days sure had some really violent tendencies, eh? LOL!!!

Well, it so happened that a couple of days later, my missus was at the shopping mall in town and she saw these…

Lek tau ko 1

…and of course, she wasted no time in grabbing a tub to take home and try…and yes, they were very nice indeed. According to the seller at the temporary stall there selling these goodies for Chinese New Year, these were made by some Hokkien lady at home.

The shapes, made using the special wooden mold, were very well done. This is a bird or a hen…

Lek tau ko 3

…I guess…and this one is probably a rat…

Lek tau ko 4

…and in the words of the mean ol’ Queen in Alice in Wonderland, “Off with their heads!!!” Muahahahahaha!!!!

I went and googled and yes, I remember what we, in my family, used to call those – kuih koya!…

Lek tau ko 2

I think it is luk tau peang in Cantonese, and by the way, in response to zmun2‘s comments, I stumbled upon the Chinese name for kuih bangkitshih fun peang, and that sure sounds like Cantonese too.

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Author: suituapui

Ancient relic but very young at heart. Enjoys food and cooking...and travelling and being with friends.

17 thoughts on “Long gone day…”

  1. This kuih koya or mung bean cookie is not commonly found here. Thanks for letting me know about the Chinese name for Kuih Bangkit. Where did you find it? There is another name for it, I know it by “Fan Po Peang” (Cantonese). The name you gave I guess should be 茨粉饼. This website gave both Chinese names for kuih bangkit and also the recipe – are you game to make some?

    http://nasilemaklover.blogspot.my/2014/01/kuih-bangkit-tapioca-biscuits.html

    No, thank you – since we have very good ones here. My missus bought the bangkit at this same stall too – cheap, only RM14.00 and just as nice as the one I bought earlier, RM22, but they’re much thinner so quite a lot in this one ended up broken.

    I so happened to see some lady blogging about making those and she gave the Chinese name in brackets – did not go and check if there were any others. I did drop by hers to see – it seemed that she made her bangkit using the kuih koya mold – so hers looked like kuih koya, tasted like bangkit. Gee!!! I wouldn’t know if the names are one and the same, English & Mandarin. I do not read the latter.

  2. Oh yes, lek tau ko, my childhood CNY cookies. Looks great. Making lek tau ko is not an easy task. Have to press very hard to make it firm so that the shape & pattern are visible and have to be very careful knocking them out from the wooden mold. May I know how pieces inside that container?

    Not sure. One “layer” like that around 18, they’re very small…around 5-6 layers, so probably 100 inside. Only one in town…and thankfully, it is very very nice, almost all gone now. 😀

  3. Hi Arthur, may I know which shopping mall has this lek tao ko?

    Wisma Sanyan. I think my missus said the stall was somewhere near the McD’s icecream stall. The bangkit is very nice too but too thin, so a lot pecah, in bits and pieces.

    1. Thanks Arthur. I went over yesterday but it was sold out and the stall owner told me they will not replenish their stock as it is too close to CNY 🙂

      Oh dear! I wonder where we can get to buy them on ordinary days. Really good, wouldn’t mind buying to enjoy even when it is not Chinese New Year.

  4. Gone to the cny bazaar in Kenyalang yesterday. Saw those prickled and colourful fruits, assams and traditional cookies. But I did not buy any. Just love letters from a Malay aunt. Simple and economical for us this year. ^^

    Wahhhhhh!!!! So rich, no need to scrimp and save for new year – old people would want to spend lavishly, the rest of the year, they eat plain rice and salt. 😉

  5. I’m not sure I remember this cookie. Is it very hard to bite through? I remember one that looks similar but was very hard.

    Not really hard, crumbles at first bite. Texture is something like kuih bangkit, taste completely different. Maybe those factory produced ones would be harder. I positively remember I had not so nice ones when I was young – sold in the shops in yellow/orange tins.

  6. I like these beans cookies too… I think we oldies know how to eat these, my kids definitely don’t enjoy them as much as I do… they prefer the white shu fun piang, the ones that melt in their mouths… 🙂

    Those would be the kuih bangkit, I guess? My girl prefers those too, the fragrance of the coconut milk in it. Maybe this one has its unique taste, may need a little getting used to.

  7. Nice! We went shopping for CNY cookies just now too.

    I saw these ones, as well as a similar textured one which is made with salted egg. It tastes the same, texturally, but has a bit of a salted egg hint to it. I like those too, a bit like worms.

    Also noticed a lot of savory things this year, there’s even crab stick crackers! I love the look of those.

    Real crab, I hope, not those imitation crab sticks. Not into those, don’t like the smell.

    Salted egg? I wonder that would taste like. Like worms? Hmmm…I guess the world is your oyster, up to you to create your own…like I saw all kinds of bak kua flavoure these days – honey, watermelon, whatever…but we old folks are more old school – would stick to what we knew long ago and loved so well.

    1. It’s the imitation crab sticks. I don’t think they can afford to sell real crab. I have a fondness for the crab sticks, I know it’s just made with fish paste but still it tastes soooo good.

      Probably coz of the preservative and salt inside. Haha!

      Yup, it looks like bumpy worms, they’re very popular here. Ugh, I wouldn’t eat flavored bak kua either, that sounds very strange. Correction, obviously I mean I would try it once but it doesn’t immediately sound appealing.

      My girl loves those crab sticks too – we must have those in our steamboat but no, I am not eating them. 😀 Same here, I would not mind trying anything new but old habits die hard, I guess. At the end of the day, I would still crave for how it was before. Unfortunately, things don;t stay the same – even the so-called original or authentic somehow may not be as good as it was in the past. Perhaps we did not have much then so these things seemed to be so much nicer then.

  8. I may have eaten this lek tau cookies when I was small. You mentioned in reply to my comment earlier that the animal shapes I mentioned for kuih bangkit was probably these lek tau cookies. No, it wasn’t. It was kuih bangkit and they put red dots for the eyes. So nostalgic 🙂

    Ohhhhhh???? No wonder I saw in that lady’s blog – she used the wooden mold with all the animal shapes to make her kuih bangkit. Interesting how we may be all from the same stock and yet we can be different one way or another.

    Here, the wooden mold is only for lek tau ko…and for kuih bangkit, we stamp out the flower shape and then use the brass pincers to clip the designs on the biscuits.

    These days, it seems that they use the special mold to stamp out the biscuits with the flower pattern imprinted on them. The taste may be the same, just as nice but somehow, I am kind of disappointed with the flowers – it’s just not the same. This is a culture to be preserved – should not take shortcuts like that…like how I’ve noticed people these days wearing baju kebaya with buttons. Sacrilege!!! If they are too lazy to pin the keronsang, then they should not wear it – use something else instead.

  9. Yes, we used to bite off the parts of the animals bit by bit. OMG!!! But this sure brings back nostalgic moments.

    Kids! We were all the same, weren’t we? 😀

  10. I have been seeing CNY cookies all around, but dare not buy much, if not, i will end up out of control and finish the whole bottle in no times, and then i will be sobbing, have to work extra extra hard doing workout…

    Like what the old folks would say, once a year, never mind. If no indulgence, no enjoyment, where got any meaning left in chuo sing nian? It would be like any other day.

  11. Oh this cookies i think i saw kristie wong made before. Posted in her blog.

    Not keen to make coz people say very cooling.

    Lek tau memang cooling, boil and drink. Good wor…

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