Crowded…

Last Sunday morning, after the church service, we stopped by here for brunch and boy, it was so very crowded.

My girl and the mum wanted the wat tan hor kway teow (RM4.00)…

Twin Corner Wat tan hor kway teow 1

…that the latter had the last time and liked a lot but they were told that they would have to wait for at least half an hour and I said it was all right as we were in no hurry to go anywhere anyway so they placed their orders and waited.

Janggut’s stall was closed and my guess would be that he does not open for business on Sundays. I would think that is not a very good move considering that there are so many people on the day and he certainly would enjoy brisk business if he had been around. Perhaps it would be better for him to have his rest day on say, Friday, perhaps.

The roti canai guys were in full swing though and it sure looked like they were getting a lot more orders than on other days. I went and ordered their roti telur (roti canai with egg added) plus bawang (onion), RM2.00…

Twin Corner roti telur and bawang

…and it was very good, very much nicer compared to the roti telurΒ (RM1.80) I had the previous time. The fragrance of the onion sure brought the taste to a whole new level. The dhal dip…

Twin Corner dhal dip

…was consistently good so I really enjoyed it a lot.

The kampua noodle stall was enjoying brisk business too and I decided to try their pian sip (RM2.80)…

Twin Corner pian sip

…but I would say it was all right, nothing that would make it much different from most of the rest.

Wondering what the porridge special was, I wanted that but the lady told me that they do not have it on Sundays. I guess they would not be able to cope with the crowd if they had to cook that as well so they would just concentrate on the kampua mee and stuff. I asked for the kway teow kampua listed on their menu instead and this was what I got (RM2.80)…

Twin Corner kway teow kampua 1

I was wondering what that was – kway teow mixed with the kampua noodles perhaps but it turned out to be just kway teow tossed kampua-style except that it was not exactly like that as kam/kang in kampua/kangpuang means dry and there should not be any sauce in it…

Twin Corner kway teow kampua 2

I did not know what sauce that was but it sure made it taste quite unlike kampua noodles as I know it but it did not taste too bad. I thought it was quite nice actually.

Finally, after what seemed like forever, possibly more than a mere half an hour, the wat tan hor kway teow came…

Twin Corner wat tan hor kway teow

…and after the two ladies had finished off everything on their plates, we left…with a mental note in my head to drop by this place on any other day but, as the song goes, never on Sunday…

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Author: suituapui

Ancient relic but very young at heart. Enjoys food and cooking...and travelling and being with friends.

21 thoughts on “Crowded…”

  1. Wat tan hor kway teow looks delicious and if it was polished off by the ladies I guess that’s testimony in itself. πŸ™‚

    It was good but the thickness and texture of the kway teow is not as nice as the ones in the peninsula – thinner, narrower and above all, finer and near translucent. I prefer the ones over there.

  2. The kway teow kampua is the thick kind. Looks like those thick ones that I like. Never on a sunday? But still many delicious dishes available as shown in your post.

    I get put off by the crowd and having to wait a long time. Old man, all kinds of idiosyncrasies. πŸ˜€ A cousin of mine actually prefers our thick and white kway teow, but not me. Same thing in the wat tan hor – I think there is a factory here, one place supplies all.

  3. Sunday is where the business come. Seldom people closed for business on Sunday. Definitely not in Kuching. Off day mostly on Monday while some have it on Tuesday. If PH falls on Monday, some will open and replace off day on Tuesday.

    Yummy food. Love to try that wat tan hor kuaw tiaw now! Now I know what to eat for breakfast!

    Personally, I would prefer Kuching’s tomato kway teow.

    Here, all the Malay shops and stalls used to close on Sundays. Maybe, that was the day when everybody would be home, time for bonding, spending quality time with everybody. But these days, I find that many of them are open. Most will close by noon though, on Sundays especially, including the Chinese ones.

  4. I like how the roti is properly cut that way.

    I’ve seen some elsewhere where they clap their hands together with the roti in between and just serve it like that, squashed, totally out of shape. Not much of a presentation, that’s for sure but I guess most are used to that and do not mind it one bit.

  5. Your roti telur bawang looks so nice, and they cut into slices for you upon serving, nice.. Then no need to susah susah carik with fork & spoon, haha.. Ahhh, wat-tan kuey teow, my boys’ favourite.. Anything with egg+starchy gravy, they like..

    One of my girl’s favourite.

    Oh? They do not cut it for you there? I saw the guy with a chopper…chop…chop..chop and serve.

  6. All looks good but kway teow kampua, I give it a pass. I prefer to eat kampua or kway teow on its own but not mixed. Like durian, eat on its own but when eat with rice or make into tempoyak, I cannot never swallow. Weekends are the best days to do brisk business. Over here people usually off on Monday.

    Oooo…I love tempoyak and in my family, they all love samui, a Melanau delight – durian flesh mixed with sagu’ (sago pellets) and lard!

    It was just kway teow, not mixed with kampua as I had thought initially…but I would prefer kampua mee this way, not quite the way to serve kway teow, if you ask me. Here, they may close on Monday, Tuesday or Wednesday…and looks like some Malay ones close on Sundays. All different days, very hard to remember and keep track.

  7. Although I love to eat onions (well caramelised ones), I would never have it in my roti telur….that’s because it gets wrapped inside and doesn’t really get cooked (other than the ones that manage to pierce through the canai skin) and would usually have a raw taste in them which I dislike immensely! 😦

    First time having it and I love it!!! I love sliced onions or shallots raw on sardines with chili and calamansi lime squeezed all over it – much more than having them all cooked together. Can’t remember where else I’ve had onions raw, in burgers maybe.

    Anyway, I am sure they would not mind, would not be much of a trouble at all, grilling the onions on their hot plate first before adding it to their canai and egg…if you ask them nicely, that is.

  8. The wat tan hor kway teow sauce looks superb. I think the movie “Never on Sunday” was shown when I was still in secondary school.

    I only knew of the song…by Connie Francis. πŸ˜€ Ya, this place does dish out some pretty good fried stuff, just that one would need to wait a little longer on Sundays. 😦

  9. wan tan hor is one of my mom’s favourite dishes too, though i don’t really love it … i’d definitely go for the roti telur though! flooded with lots of thick dal πŸ˜€

    I’m ok with it, not a priority but would not mind having it sometimes for a change. I would prefer something Malay or Malaysian, usually…like nasi lemak, mee mamak, just to name two. Roti canai and all the other variations would be add-ons, extras… Hehehehehehe!!!!

  10. Seems like the kway teow is much more than the soup from the picture, isn’t it or just the way they put the kway teow and makes it look like that

    The one I had? No soup in that, just a lot of sauce…and if it is what it is supposed to be, there should not be any sauce at all. I did mention that in the post, didn’t I? Thankfully, it was all right…but definitely not something I would want to have again, nothing great.

  11. Koay Teow Kampua looks a little odd, fatter than the ones we have here, probably that is why it looks odd to me haha

    Thicker, coarse…not as fine, white! I prefer the ones you all have over there though some here may beg to differ.

  12. Busy restaurants are frustrating! I feel for ya!

    First time on a Sunday, o.k. on weekdays. I would settle for a place less busy even if the food may not be as nice. Kind of stressful having to sit and wait for so long in the midst of all the noise and busy-ness…and it is worse in our tropical heat. These coffee shops here are not air-conditioned, poorly-ventilated some of them, but if you are lucky, you may get to sit under a fan.

    1. I agree! Crammed and busy is frustrating and not a very pleasant dining experience!

      For some, it seems they find delight in that though – what they call the coffee shop culture here. Not for me.

  13. The Kampua kueh tiaw looks good. I actually grew up eating Kolok Kueh Tiaw instead of Mee so I’m sure I’ll like this!

    I’ve had kampua kway teow before – kway teow tossed dry like kampua, same ingredients. I think I would prefer that, for a change sometimes.

    But this one is different. Dunno what sauce they used, maybe the one from cooking the sliced meat on top. Did not taste the same but it was all right, not bad…just not something I would be thinking of having again.

  14. All the food above are to my choice… and the prices are very reasonable too.. I am sure you will drop by more often… πŸ™‚

    We do drop by here time and time again but I think this is the first time on a Sunday. The area is outside the town centre, not congested, easy parking but not free on weekdays. 😦

All opinions expressed in my blog are solely my own, that is my prerogative - you may or may not agree, that is yours. To each his/her own.

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