Last stop, this town…

After that heavy lunch at Sg Tenggang, I really did not feel like going for the celebrated giant prawn noodles at Jakar or Glory Cafe in Sarikei, so I thought I would just drop by Aik Seng in Sarikei for their famous charcoal-toasted bun with butter, own-made pandan kaya and peanut butter too! Unfortunately, luck was not on my side – the shop was closed!!!

That was why I ended up here…

Medan Selera Sarikei

…and when I asked the man at the steamed pao stall…

Pao stall

…there why Aik Seng was closed and whether it was their usual practice to have a rest day on Wednesday, he said he did not know. He thought it would be open all the time. Sigh!!! I guess it was just not meant to be – my finally getting to try the toast that people have praised to the skies.

I seemed to recall hearing something about the steamed pao at this place too – some people said that they were nice so I bought two of their char siew pao

Sarikei char siew pao 1

…and sat down…

Medan Selera Sarikei inside

…to eat.

I can’t say that I’m all that fond of the slightly yellowish old-school steamed pao skin but the filling…

Sarikei char siew pao 2

…was very nice and there was a bit of egg in it too…

Sarikei char siew pao 3

I would say I enjoyed it but no, I would not come all the way just to eat this, that’s for sure.

After that brief tea break in Sarikei, I headed back to Sibu and reached home at 4 something, and thus ended my brief trip to Kuching.

Incidentally, I must thank my uncle and his family in Kuching for making this bak koi (Chinese steamed egg cake with minced meat and fragrant fried shallots)…

Bak koi 1

…for me to bring ย back home and they were so thoughtful as to pack a few bite-size pieces for me to eat along the way…

Bak koi 2

…too and I must also thank my auntie in Kuching for that pack of Kelantan-made serunding (beef floss) and my cousin for the goodies from her school…

Serunding & St 3's goodies

…and thanks again, all – my cousins and the mum, for the delightful dinner that I have blogged about earlier.

Back in Sibu, my good friend, Annie, in KL contacted me and asked me to get something from her mum who had just returned from a holiday there with her daughter and grandsons which I did…and guess what I got!

More serunding

Serunding!!! There is no label on that huge pack so my guess is that this would be a very special made-to-order one and my bet is that it is going to be really good!

Hmmmm!!! Now, let’s see what I can do with all that serunding. Yes, you guessed right – I’ve started off with this serunding fried rice…

Serunding fried rice

…and it turned out really very nice with the added Thai Basil leaves and chopped spring onions from my garden and my missus’ extra-hot pounded chili to complement all the flavours of the serunding. In fact, I enjoyed it so much that the next morning, I was delighted to find some more leftover rice in the fridge so I fried it again the exact same way…

Serunding fried rice, reprise

…and derived just as much pleasure from it the second time around!

Perhaps I can use it to make some serunding puffs…or some glutinous rice rolls with serunding filling too? We’ll see!

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Author: suituapui

Ancient relic but very young at heart. Enjoys food and cooking...and travelling and being with friends.

16 thoughts on “Last stop, this town…”

  1. Too bad the shop was closed but life goes on. The bak koi is new to me. I thought it is like steamed egg chawanmushi but the texture is like normal cake texture. So special and it is savoury too.

    Your friend Annie and your relatives are so thoughtful. No need to say, your serunding fried rice must be very tasty! Or you can make deep fried or baked mini popiahs with the serunding.

    Yes, everybody’s so kind and thoughtful – I feel truly blessed. Yes, great substitute for the usual prawn or chicken floss, serunding on those snacks.

    Bak koi is just egg cake, in Hokkien, we call that kay nerng kor…sugar reduced and the sweetness balanced by the savoury minced pork plus the fragrance of the fried shallots. Very nice. Can buy at the kueh stalls here but of course, those – it would be hard to find much meat and shallots, very sparingly embedded in the cake.

  2. Hardly can find bak koi at the kueh stalls. Usually they have the kay nerng kor only. I always love your fried rice and with the added serunding & basil leaves, it sure gives an extra kick.

    I did buy at one stall here, never bought again so you can guess how good that was. ๐Ÿ˜€ Yes, I enjoyed the fried rice very much – still got a lot of serunding, will surely fry again if I see any leftover rice in the fridge.

  3. Very generous bak koi!! Your fried rice is so beautifully fried but I would omit serunding. Hehe.

    LOL!!! You’re no fan of serunding, eh? This one I got was very very nice, nicer than those they sell at the kampung stalls here, oozing with flavours, no strong beef or whatever smell. – that is why I don’t bother buying those.

  4. Anything’s good in sarikei? How many hours drive away from Kuching?

    Around 1 hour from Sibu, so 5 to 6 hours perhaps. Nice, small town, similar to Sibu – very Chinese/Foochow.

  5. I always loves your fried rice…

    I tried a bit of the fried rice at one place in Kuching – nowhere near, did not bother to mention it in my blog about the place.

  6. All the food looks very good. Love the look of the bak koi and the fried rice. Haven’t had serunding for years, too.

    The Kelantan-made ones are very nice. Shouldn’t be a problem bringing that into Oz. My cousins just went back from Singapore…and the customs asked if they had any Bee Cheng Hiang…or things from Bengawan Solo, all the nyonya kueh, the pineapple tarts and all. I guess they are so used to seeing those already by now.

  7. I’ve never seen steamed egg cake with fried shallots….but with all the shallots, it must be good like the shallot cookies I made for Chinese New Year too.

    That reminds me of the let tao kor with its layer of fried shallots in the middle – more or less along that same line, I guess – slightly sweet plus slightly savoury plus the fragrance of the fried shallots. Very nice.

  8. Bak koi is something new to me. I am sure it is very tasty. I am not very fond of serunding or those Chinese pork floss.

    Usually I am not all that fond of serunding – like lemang, I would rather have it with rendang but this one is very very nice. Would just eat it like that sometimes, none of the unpleasant beef smell or the overcooked coconut oil/santan smell.. Yet to open the packet from Annie, bet it is just as good!

  9. Ohhh I rmb my dad told me b4 that aik seng will always halt their business during the whole raya celebration. ๐Ÿ˜ƒ

    Yes, a St Anthony teacher just mentioned that to me on Facebook – all throughout Ramadhan and Raya, not sure when they will resume business. Why? They’re Muslim converts or their workers are all Muslims?

  10. Oh no! You had me hooked with “home made peanut butter” – you must return with your report and photos once open again. ๐Ÿ™‚

    Maybe this time next year. Even though we are so near, somehow we never bother to drive over…

  11. ooo i’ve never tried serunding fried rice before … hmm, maybe you could try serunding fried instant noodles … or french toast with serunding ๐Ÿ˜€

    Bet it would taste great with bread…but I would draw the line at instant noodles, the soupy ones – I would not think they would be so nice when wet – same with meat floss.

  12. So much food blessings!! And all of them look good too… Serunding in fried rice? Must be very yummy no matter how many times you fry your rice with…

    So far no leftover rice, have not fried again. You must be missing rice a lot there? Or maybe you cook your own to eat at home?

  13. Wow! Bak kueh, hardly ever see it nowadays.

    The beef jerky looks good too! ๐Ÿ™‚

    Yes, bought once at the kueh stall in front of the shop the other side of Kim Tak – I think that was where I got it. Have not seen it since, not that I would buy it again – very little meat and fried shallots.

All opinions expressed in my blog are solely my own, that is my prerogative - you may or may not agree, that is yours. To each his/her own.

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