Now we know…

I’ve been wanting to take my friend, Philip, who’s home right now from the US, here as he’s very much into kaya toast and half-boiled eggs for breakfast. As far as I knew, at this particular place, they serve very thick ones – one eighth of a loaf and they use Golden Churn butter, no less…but from what I saw, unfortunately, they do not make their own nice and rich and thick kaya and opt for the very common Yeo’s ones. Still, that did not stop us so there we were that morning to give it (RM2.50)…

101 kaya toast

…a try. Philip liked the fact that they used butter and he thought the bread, the texture and taste, was very nice, not like the usual loaves you would be able to get daily here, there and everywhere…but he did not think it was worth RM2.50 a slice, not when they are using Yeo’s kaya! I tried a bit and I thought it could do with a little bit more toasting so that it would be crustier.

He loved the coffee very much – so far, for him, the best in town after having had quite a few disappointments at his regular places on his previous trips. I had my usual kopi-o-peng (iced black coffee)…

101 Iced black coffee and utensils for use

…and it seems that here, they give you all the chopsticks and spoons in a mug at every table but once you’re seated, they would bring another mug of hot boiling water for you to dip them in yourself.

Philip also wanted to try the chao chai hung ngang, fish (big bihun in preserved vegetable soup…with fish)…

101 chao chai hung ngang, fish

…as he had never tried it before, despite this being a Foochow dish and he himself is a true blue 100% Foochow. He thought it was really good, bursting with flavours and tasting something like the Szechuan hot and sour soup, but it was not something he would want to order again – not on a regular basis, at least, as he is not really into sour things…like me. That was such a huge bowl really and Philip insisted that I helped him with it…a little.

I ordered their Foochow fried noodles special, wet (RM9.00)…

101 Foochow fried noodles special, wet 1

…and yes, the sauce/gravy was dark – the way I would want it but I wouldn’t mind if it had not been so overly thick. Yes, it had lots of ingredients though one would think it was kind of pricey. Well, that is to be expected as this isn’t one of those coffee shop places, something a little classier, more comfortable and presentable plus the serving was huge! I would think that would be enough if shared by two…not-very-big eaters and normally, you do not get so much ingredients elsewhere…

101 Foochow fried noodles special, wet 2

I certainly would want to order this again the next time around but I would have to remember to ask for a bit more greens.

Another thing about these places, it does not matter how long one would sit and chat and yes, we were there for quite some time, catching up with each other’s lives and discussing things of interest while enjoying our respective orders.

Of course, I could not have any more lunch that day and my missus was out that same morning with her mum and brother and they too stopped by some place for something to eat. Come evening time, instead of going through the hassle of having to cook dinner, we went back to the Bandong Ramadhan Bazaar to buy something. My missus went and bought the nasi kuning again and I bought the rojak Kassim and also these specialΒ popiah

Bandong Ramadhan Bazaar special popiah 1

…to go with the rice. I don’t really know what was inside – some vegetables cooked in their own way…

Bandong Ramadhan Bazaar special popiah 2

…and yes, it was nice but no, it wasn’t anything that would get me rushing back for more.

I was walking past this cafe and went looking at what they had for sale in front of the shop and I saw these…

De'Mas Cafe balitongs

…balitongs and could not resist buying RM5.00 of those. Gosh! I had not had them for a long long time – my girl is not all that fond of them so that was why I never bought them nor ordered the dish whenever we ate out. My! My! It certainly looked like they are everyone’s favourites – I shared the photograph of it on Facebook and in no time at all, there were so many LIKEs. Everyone said they were their favourite too and like me, they had not eaten it for a long while as well. This was the first time I had these cooked Malay style, masak lemak (cooked with santan/coconut milk) and yes, it was good! I don’t know what herbal leaves those were that they had added – it did not really taste like Thai basil leaves – but they were very very fragrant and very nice indeed!

So, all in all, that was a very good day indeed – with a lovely outing and an enjoyable brunch…plus a delightful dinner to round things up at the end.

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Author: suituapui

Ancient relic but very young at heart. Enjoys food and cooking...and travelling and being with friends.

23 thoughts on “Now we know…”

  1. I believe I will like the chao chai hung ngang but I don’t know where I can get to eat this in KL. Same for the balitongs, not seen them here either.

    Nice catching up with your friend, Philip over good food and both of you must have a lot to talk about since you only get to see each other during the 2 times he visits Sibu in one year.

    Dunno where they have that in KL – shouldn’t be a problem, the ingredients are available everywhere…except maybe the Foochow red wine unless they make their own. My cousin in Melbourne makes her own – desperation drives people to desperate measures. πŸ˜€

    Yes, always look forward to his visits – enjoy his company and going around eating…eating…eating, of course. πŸ˜€

  2. I love balitongs too. I only get to eat them if I find them in a buffet spread as William is not a fan of it so we wont order this dining out.

    I like sour stuffs so I think I’ll like what Philip had.

    Just like my missus – the more sourish, the better. Guys don’t like it too sour, I think…not fat ones like me, of that I’m quite sure.

    Same here, never order, never buy as my girl is not fond of those chut chut! πŸ˜€

  3. I remember those toast bread, I used to eat lots of those before with condensed milk

    Used to eat bread like that, not anymore. Hard to get condensed milk here now, the real thing. It’s all “sweetened creamer” palm oil – milk substitutes. 😦

  4. Wow, that is a very thick slice of bread!

    Seems that was a trend here at one time – I know a few other places here doing it like this too and many were drawn to it, a novelty. I would prefer thinner toasts – butter on on side, kaya on the other, in generous amounts, and sandwiched together.

  5. I have never come across balitong in the wet market I go. Maybe in Satok market but too far from my place. I missed those.

    Hmm. After my experience with chao chai hung ngang in Kuching, I think I skip this dish for sometimes. Hehe. But I do mind the Foochow noodle.

    Dunno of any good one in Kuching, maybe MeKong…opposite Heritage Restaurant. Their Foochow stuff is good! We have balitongs at the central market but we never buy since my girl does not eat. She loves cockles though.

  6. A pass for chao chai hung ngang and go for the Foochow fried noodles. Special popiah looks like flour batter wrap with fillings and deep fried, not wrap with the real popiah skin..Owh, I love balitongs or chut chut as we call it. Has been donkey year since I last had it.

    I think it’s the frozen popiah skins – the Malays use those. Dunno if it was coated with egg or what and there was some sambal on top – I took the photo of the wrong side. 😦

  7. Wah, your first picture I like already! But yours is kosong.. I’ve seen somewhere, it’s called roti babi or something.. They make the bread into a “cover” or something, can “open” and “close”, inside there’s this thick gravy filling with mixed peas and pork, like pork chop in Hailam sauce..

    Some things are best kept simple, like what we used to enjoy when we were young. Not quite into these modern mutants.

  8. Very thick toast indeed, i prefer those rustic loaves with crusty-fluffy texture. Not the local square bread 😑

    This is like the old school bread we used to eat when growing up, not the soft, kind of mushy ones we have today.

  9. That’s a very fine looking roti! Those balitong.. makes me miss balitong.

    Everybody seems to love it and misses it – the impression I got on Facebook. πŸ˜€

  10. Ayoyoyo… should have read your blog after break the fast. 😝 Lol!

    πŸ˜€ πŸ˜€ πŸ˜€ Stay away during the day…for this month at least. Not many days left now…

  11. Before I read that it was popiah, it looked like goreng pisang to me. Of course, you’re bound to get many likes for balithong (just like cockles)….anything that we can’t have a lot of or is a dying trend nowadays gets our top votes! ;D Now you make me crave for some balithongs or cockles!

    The forbidden fruit tastes sweeter, eh? Hehehehehehe!!! Forgive me for I have sinned! πŸ˜›

  12. The food looks so good. Making me hungry now…

    Hehehehe!!! That’s the whole idea. Well, if you’re one of those fasting this month, you’ll have to wait till sundown.

  13. I didn’t know they make condensed milk with palm oil nowadays. I’ll have to check the ones we get here and see the ingredients listed; not that we take a lot of it. Maybe a can or two a year!

    They do here! Look at the label – it says sweetened creamer. They are not called condensed milk. Looks the same, tastes really close..just not the same, not cow’s milk. We hardly ever buy and eat – we do buy evaporated milk though…for our curry. It does not go bad as easily as coconut milk in our hot and humid tropical weather.

  14. I like the last dish… Like you, it has been ages since I last ate those… Eating them has a technique…if only they are clean and properly reared…

    These sure look very very clean…and yes, no complaints about the cleanliness while or after eating. Very nice! But if you see on tv what they feed on, you would not want to eat them anymore. Hehehehehe!!!!

  15. That toast with butter and kaya brings me back to my childhood days when we stopped for drinks at the coffee shops when travelling between KL and Terengganu. I remembered how good it was. Yum! That popiah looks like it was dipped into egg or batter before it is fried. Or is the skin actually omelette?

    Yes, old school bread and old school toast. Too bad my friend is not keen on Yeo’s kaya. No, it was popiah skin and I think they coated it lightly in some batter, not egg or omelette. Not all that great, wouldn’t say it took it up a new level from the normal popiah skin, nothing great.

  16. oooo, i used to like siput sedut when i was younger, but now that i’m old and lazy, it feels too tiring to suck the flesh out of those shells! πŸ˜€

    You need to have the right technique, my man. Suck the tail first to create a vacuum inside…then suck through the main hole/mouth…and it will come out easily…instantly. πŸ˜€

  17. Oh… everything looks delicious! I’m really curious about the big bihun in preserved vegetable soup…with fish. Is something in that fermented? I’ll have to Google to see…

    The vegetable’s preserved – salted and fermented and the red wine used as well – it’s a sourish dish.

  18. I like balitongs always have it when travel way back from Melacca, but now hardly.

    I know one place that does it really well, very nice but we would not order if my girl’s around. She does not eat those!

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