Why can’t I…

The other day, I shared this photograph of my fried kway teow

Fried kway teow

…in my post and no, I would not say that it was an attempt on my part to whip up some Penang char kway teow as I am sure those armchair critics would come and start slamming me, insisting that it is nowhere like the real thing. Where is the duck egg? The taugeh (bean sprouts)? You did not fry it over a charcoal fire? Did you use lard? Where are the pork fat crusts? Does it have the wok hei smell? Sometimes, I really wonder whether they can even cook themselves at all but never mind! Sticks and stone may break my bones – words never will…and I will just say that I just fried the kway teow with garlic, soy sauce, prawns, fish cake slices and chopped spring onions plus two eggs and if I choose to do it in any which way I like, why can’t I?

Well, what happened that day was I went and bought one kilo of fresh kway teow (around RM2.00, I think – did not really take note of the exact price) just because I felt like it and the next morning, I cooked around half of it for breakfast. Of course, it was nice – you can’t go wrong with prawns! I had a plate of it myself, and it sure was a generous serving, and I left the rest for my missus. Normally, with my fried rice or fried bihun, there would be some left by lunch time and I would finish everything off then but that day, there was none left! Hmmmm…that probably was an indication as to how nice it was. Wink! Wink!

A few days later, I decided to finish off what was left of the 1 kilo and got the ingredients ready…

Ingredients

– finely chopped garlic and cilantro (daun sup – from my garden), a few prawns and pieces of squid and some fish cake slices.

I tossed the kway teow with fish sauce and Thai chili sauce…

Kway teow with fish sauce and chili sauce

…and I was ready to start cooking.

I fried the garlic in a bit of oil till golden brown and then in went the prawns, squid and fish cake and cilantro…followed by the kway teow and once I had mixed everything together thoroughly and fried it all well enough, I added two eggs. When the eggs were cooked, it was done and I dished it all out…

My fried kway teow 1

…sprinkled some chopped spring onions (also from my garden) on top and served. There you are – another version of my fried kway teow that I am sure is not like any other sold outside – just the way I like it!

I was quite tempted to use my tom yam sauce but decided against it as I wanted to try something different to see if it…

My fried kway teow 2

…was any good.

It went absolutely well with my missus’ own blended chili and garlic…

Blended chili and garlic

…and I would say that I enjoyed it very much but come lunchtime that day, there was a little bit left – less than one serving of the whole lot that I cooked…

My fried kway teow 3

Maybe I did not divide the kway teow equally so there was more this time around…or maybe, the way I cooked it the previous time was nicer? Never mind! There is no law that says I must cook it in any one way or other and if I choose to cook it like this or like that, why can’t I? Too bad if you  prefer it some other way, just eat! LOL!!!

Moving away from the post proper, I really must thank my girl’s ex-coursemate who has been posted to a school here in Sibu. He made some lovely banana cake…

Bubu's banana cake

…for his buka puasa (breaking of fast) and the nice and thoughtful guy went through the trouble of sending some to my house to let me enjoy. Isn’t that so sweet of him?

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Author: suituapui

Ancient relic but very young at heart. Enjoys food and cooking...and travelling and being with friends.

22 thoughts on “Why can’t I…”

  1. Oh it looks fragrantly delicious.

    I’m like you, I don’t follow a recipe and prepare meals how I want them. I rarely receive complaints on my cooking. I do love to cook, I just like doing my own thing in the kitchen. The down side is, when someone asks me for the recipe for something I’ve made. I have to guess, when I give them measurements. Some people think that I am purposely withholding that information, but I tell them, that isn’t the case. I never measure.

    That’s what we call agak-agak (estimate) in old school-style cooking, worse if they tell you in terms of the cost – e.g. 10 sen spring onions, 10 sen five-spice powder. 10 sen long ago is very much different than what you will get today. 😀

    But yes, it’s the same here! I do not have measurements – I just follow my nose, so to speak. I watch cooking shows on tv and I seem to notice that though the masterchefs have measurements in their recipes…they also “go by ear” and add something and then add a little more…or add more of something else added earlier. Some, of course, have everything pre-measured, ready in bowls, plates and saucers…and they just added one by one – like robots. So tedious!

    It all boils down to the individual – some people like it sweeter, others are not fond of it too salty, some like this…some like that and some may choose to add their own extras. Why not? I google recipes to have a look and good grief! There are so many of one thing and are often quite different from one another, so who’s to say this is THE standard recipe – you do it a little different, you are so so so wrong?

    1. There are so many of one thing and are often quite different from one another, so who’s to say this is THE standard recipe – you do it a little different, you are so so so wrong?

      Exactly! So many slight deviations, who is so say which is the right way to prepare the dish? If the key components are there, why be so nitpicky? I say enjoy the meal and be happy. Hee hee… 😉

      Indeed. As long as it is nice and pleases you very much, who are those people to say that is not the way to do it? I guess there are people like that – they open their mouths just to criticise, they are the ones who know better than everybody else.

  2. I like thick kway teow and the two different styles you cooked look really delicious!

    Melissa’s ex coursemate is so thoughtful to share the banana cake he made with you all.

    Indeed! Such a nice boy. He really didn’t have to but he did!

    I like the thin translucent ones you all have in the peninsula (some told me they’re called hor fun, not kway teow)…but we can’t get that here so we will just have to make do with our own – the thick and white ones. I’ve tried the dry factory-made ones – sold here in the supermarkets but no, they’re not the same, not at all like kway teow. More like the big bihun…flattened:
    https://suituapui.wordpress.com/2013/04/23/not-what-i-expected/

    1. I use hor fun and kway teow interchangeably. I will like the flattened big bihun because if it is like bihun then that means the rice taste is stronger and it is not elastic/springy. Translucent springy/elastic hor fun I heard uses a lot of boric acid.

      Oh dear! Then bihun is better? I guess it is ok once in a long while, not that I would buy and cook and eat every day. They do not use it for our yellow mee here so it is softer, not so firm…and it will soak the gravy or the soup very quickly and become bigger and not very nice, have to eat quickly. Otherwise, the taste is nicer, does not have that smell than many do not like.

  3. So many stuff in your kuaw tiaw!! I like!!

    And I like a nice banana cake too. Hehe. Very kind of your daughter’s friend to give you some.

    Yes, it was very nice – could taste the fresh bananas in it. Those at the bakery, it’s just cake – though some are nice too…but it’s mostly banana essence.

  4. I like to eat kway teow, and this one is with tao key and has squid. Usually I eat outside they will lots of tao key which I really don’t like that much.

    You mean tau (hu) kee (bean curd sticks) or tau geh (bean sprouts)?

  5. I like both verson of your fried keay teow. Sometimes cooking from scratch will turn out good as long as there are enough ingredients. I love lots of taugeh/greens in my fried kway teow. Mel’s friend can bake so good banana cake….my favourite too.

    Indeed! The bottom line is what ingredients you have. You add something extra – the taste may be completely different, sometimes nicer…sometimes not really but we learn from this and go from there, whether we will want to add it again or not next time. I do like greens (sawi manis) in my noodles but kway teow, I would add tau geh unless I am frying it with sauce/gravy like tomato kway teow or wan tan hor – my personal preference. Yes, very nice the banana cake.

  6. Your version of ckt looks good, a lot of wok hei, although colour not very dark.. Plus squids somemore.. I love a lot of taugeh and cockles in my ckt..

    For me, the taugeh must be cooked – some will just throw in raw after the cooking but of course, some people may like it like this…and some others would fry too long and the taugeh gets overcooked, not nice. Not sure if anybody likes taugeh like that – the longer you cook, the harder to chew – I find it easier and nicer to eat when it is still a little bit crunchy.

  7. Looking at the pic of your kway teow, the ones over there are a lot thicker than the ones here…it looks almost like pan mee. Yes, we do very thin kway teow here which we call hor fun (usually made into chicken/prawn soup hor fun) but we also have kway teow that is not as thick (for char kway teow or any type of noodle soup).

    Yes, not the same…and not like pan mee either. I do prefer the kway teow (and hor fun) in the peninsula…but some here prefer our own. To each his own, I guess.

  8. Just like you, I cook for my own tastes. I do cook for family, but not confident enough to cook for other guests.

    I’m a bit better than you – I do cook to entertain family and friends…and with the captive audience, they would have to say everything is nice, no choice. Hehehehehe!!!!

  9. Who cares what the armchair critics will say. It looks delicious !!! End of the day, when your tummy is full and happy, you will be full and happy as well. The banana bread looks great !!! Just the way I like it, super super super moist. Happy weekend to you and your family ☺

    I would agree with you on that – as long as it makes me happy, it’s good. Too bad if others do not feel the same about it.

    Yes, the cake was really good, moist…and cushiony soft. The boy’s very good at it obviously.

  10. Of course you can….cook however you wish hee..hee… There’s no hard and fast rules in cooking at home and I’ll have to say that’s a very respectable looking plate of char koay teow! For fried noodles, my favorite is always koay teow in whatever style.

    Exactly! Even in the case of kampua noodles here – the taste of the ones at one stall may not be exactly the same as another…and there would be those with stewed pork, those with minced pork – I would just pick the one I like best, too bad if it is not to somebody else’s liking – they can go and eat the one they like, no need to come and criticise my choice like I am so so so wrong, such a noob…like I’ve retarded taste buds, pick one that, to them, is no good. I really don’t know what is wrong with this people – you think some other is good, you go and eat lor. What’s the big deal, really?

  11. I like your kuey teow. You motivate me to try frying my own kuey teow too. Later tonight I’ll go buy something and see if tomorrow I can fry some 😀

    Yes, yes…and blog about it. I would love to see how you do yours. Bet it will be great.

  12. I saw your blended chili and garlic this morning.. i got the urge to do sambal nasi lemak… and now.. it’s in the process.. hahaha… maybe tomorrow i can use the sambal to do some fried beehoon .. hehehe

    i also have the urge to do cake.. but .. maybe buying is easier >.<

    To appease all your cravings? Wowwwww!!!! You’ll end up looking like me when the time finally comes! Muahahahahaha!!!!!

  13. You are a good cook, Arthur… No doubt about that… Your fried koay teow must be very tasty…. I wanna try frying koay teow next time… Now I am more free, I am going to cook more!!😀

    I am sure you can get the dried ones in the US – not as nice, of course, but those would have to do. You can try frying that there – bet everyone would love it!

  14. honestly looks fine to me. home cook style~! didnt put dark soy?

    The first one, yes…second one – I wanted to try something different. Nice also but I do prefer the first – maybe we are more used to fried kway teow with dark soy sauce. Old habits die hard.

  15. Your version looks so yummy. I love squid and would surely polish it clean. Who says that a good plate of Charkwaytiaw should have cracklings? Once in a while I like to fry my own version of Kway tiaw too. It may lack the charred flavour of roadside stalls but it serves its purpose as comfort food, but I bet yours does not fall short of that flavour.

    They seem to do that over there – melt the fat, fresh in the wok…and use the lard to fry the kway teow, leaving the crusts in the oil. I, for one, do not like those crusts and would pick them out one by one and leave them by the side of the plate. I bet yours is good – minus the excessive amount of oil…and msg!

All opinions expressed in my blog are solely my own, that is my prerogative - you may or may not agree, that is yours. To each his/her own.

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