I got you…

Not one to give up easily, I went back once again to this coffee shop and yes, the lady was around…but unfortunately, she did not seem to have anything ready. The first time I was there, they told me that she would come a bit later every day, past 9.00 a.m., as she would prepare most of the things at home to bring over to the shop. Well, it certainly did not look anything like it but I just asked, anyway, and was told that I would need to wait for around half an hour or so. Ok, I said, I would wait…

In the meantime, I decided to try the pan meeย or ๆฟ้บบ, in Mandarin (RM4.00)…

Full Fortune Cafe, pan mee 1

I was wondering why it was thus called, seeing that it had got nothing to do with (frying) pans but according to Wikipedia, it is “a Hakka-style noodle, originating from Malaysia. Its Chinese name literally translates to ‘flat flour noodle’. It is part of Malaysian Chinese cuisine.” Hmmmm…interesting! I did hear before that it was hand-made and hand-torn but it seems that machine-made ones are available now, cut into strips like most regular noodles…

Pan mee

I was never a fan of the soup version so that was why I asked for it dry…

Full Fortune Cafe, pan mee 2

…and yes, it was very nice – definitely something I wouldn’t mind having again.

They gave quite a lot of the sayur manis/cangkuk manis so I took a bit of it and put it in the complimentary soup…

Lakia chai therng

…and it turned out to be like the lakia chai therng (Dayak vegetable soup) that my mum used to cook when I was small. For some reason or other, this vegetable is also called lakia chai and we loved to drink the soup as it would be so very sweet because of the vegetable…but we would leave all the leaves behind, much to my mum’s distress. LOL!!!

While I was halfway through, the lady approached my table, all apologetic and sorry that what I wanted would not be ready but no, I was not leaving without it! Tsk! Tsk! I just told her to carry on and we would see about it later…and I went on enjoying my pan mee. I had just finished when this was served (RM2.50)…

Full Fortune Cafe, popiah 1

…the popiah (spring roll) that I had been wanting to try!

The skin was not all that nice – in fact, it did not even look nice and I was wondering if it was one of those frozen ones available at the supermarkets, not something freshly-made locally. The filling was all right…

Full Fortune Cafe popiah 2

…and all in all, it was not too bad but unfortunately, it came nowhere near these awesome ones that I loved so much once. I heard that that lady is not based at any stall or shop anywhere now but anyone can call her to order and in fact, she does make them sometimes and goes around the shops and offices to sell, in packs of two. My missus met her at a bank once and she bought some home but I’m afraid they were no longer nice especially when she had packed them when still hot and by the time we ate them, it did not matter so much that they had gone cold but they had turned soggy in parts and were not all that palatable anymore.

On my way home, I spotted this in front of the mall near my house…

Delta Mall Christmas tree

I did see the Christmas decor outside a hotel in town as well but I have not been around so I wouldn’t know whether everyone has all gone full swing in their decoration and preparation for the festive season. Come to think of it, by this day next week, we would only have a month to go and the following week, another year would have gone by. Sigh!!!

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Author: suituapui

Ancient relic but very young at heart. Enjoys food and cooking...and travelling and being with friends.

28 thoughts on “I got you…”

  1. I take it that you seldom eat pan mee. When I eat pan mee,, I will request for the hand torn type if they are made on the spot. Those not made on the spot won’t have the hand torn type.

    Good to see that you waited until you got the popiah. I guess maybe the lady was in a hurry to serve you so she did not steam the popiah skin to be soft enough.

    I have not seen people making popiah skin on the spot before making the popiah. Those that I have eaten before I assume are all from frozen ones but steamed long enough to be soft.

    Steamed popiah skin? We use those freshly-made ones, no steaming needed. Quality would depend on the maker – how thin, how un-chewy/rubbery/springy and how white. Or we used the frozen square ones – just defrost, peel off layer by layer and use. Of course, these aren’t as nice…but looking at the prices of the freshly-made ones these days and how hard it is to get them (one of two – the other one was not as good and their stall is closed, dunno still making or not) – by appointment only, sometimes it is easier just to settle for less.

    The frozen ones are pretty good for deep-fried popiah. I think they use that for theirs at the Malay kuih stalls. People use to make mini ones with prawn sambal/peanut/chicken floss filling and deep-fry to serve…say for Chinese New Year.

    I’ve seen another frozen type – quite recently – round, not squares…and I looked at the instructions and they did say those would need steaming. That’s the reason why I did not buy to try – never steamed popiah skin before. May end up spoiling the whole pack, useless me.

    1. My mother used to buy frozen popiah skin and steamed them and then we will peel them off each other one by one to roll / wrap the popiah. I find that they taste very good but it has been a long time since we last did this.

      freshly-made ones mean the hawker make the popiah skin from ?rice flour/dough? in front of you before wrapping the popiah?

      Freshly-made = made by the popiah skin maker that same day/morning and the popiah lady gets from there and uses, fresh – no need to steam or whatever. That is what I would have to do whenever I make popiah at home – order from the maker (one available only on Saturdays), 1 or 2 kilos…collect early in the morning at the market (and buy the other ingredients needed), go home…cook the filling and once done, wrap with the skin and eat. Anytime better than the frozen skin. You can see the freshly-made skin here and the lady at the market in Penang making it – it requires a special skill, a special touch to get it nice and thin and absolutely perfect and must be very fast:
      https://suituapui.wordpress.com/2011/04/09/wherever-i-go/
      I bet they don’t make those frozen ones this same way in the factories.

      As for the frozen skin, I first got a pack when I was living in Kuching, 1977, from my landlady’s daughter – she brought some back from Singapore. The instructions on the pack said to defrost…and peel off and use. I gave that to my girlfriend at the time and the mum used to make very nice popiah, big and fat ones and gave me some, deep fried. She said the mum said the skin was rubbery and tough, not nice – not like the freshly-made ones…so she deep-fried them and they turned out really very well…but that depends on the one making – there have been some even worse than those frozen ones. ๐Ÿ˜ฆ

      Never read the instructions since – I do not know if they have changed them…and it now requires steaming, the square ones. Will make it a point to check it out if I see it in the shops one of these days – maybe they have changed, having discovered that steaming makes the skin better, I would not know. We have been doing it that same way since that first time. I know my favourite cafe in town will bake in the oven till slightly “tanned” in patches/parts, kind of crispy a bit – their very popular mushroom roll. That’s very nice, nicer than deep fried, I would think!

  2. The pan mee looks abit different from those in JB. Here it’s always soupy with simple ingredients, like the cangkuk manis and probably some fish balls in soup rich with anchovies. I like the popiah , looks good in the pic.

    Can’t remember if I had any with fish balls. I seldom go for pan mee. Popiah’s ok – just nowhere near the very nice one that I used to love so much. Too bad the lady has stopped selling hers now. ๐Ÿ˜ฆ

  3. Ethan also loves eating dry pan mee but the ones here is with dark soy sauce. I love the soupy version as I love sipping the hot soup. I thought the tear by hand version is called mee hoon kuih or something like that…

    I’ve heard that name before – maybe it’s the same? But handmade and hand-torn on the spot maybe? I’m not quite into the soup version – I find it more on the mild side – would go for the dry ones but like everything else, there are good ones and not so good ones – would need to know where to go. This one’s quite good.

  4. i haven’t noticed christmas decor yet in KL, though maybe i’m not paying attention enough yet. but ya, guess the malls and hotels should be putting all the decoration up as soon as possible to maximise their investment and expenditure on those lights, trees, etc. i’d like 2014 to be over soon, cos i’m looking forward to 2015 and hopefully a fresh start for all of us ๐Ÿ™‚

    You haven’t? I heard complaints that some were up before Deepavali and there wasn’t much attention given to the Indian festival at many malls? Fresh start? Hmmmm….I wonder if it will be any better – just pray it would not be worse. ๐Ÿ˜ฆ

  5. The pan mee looks good.. I love pan mee too, and I always order the soupy ones.. They usually put cangkuk manis or spinach, depends.. And oohhh lots of crispy crunchy ikan bilis.. And their special cili for pan mee… Sour and spicy, yummmzzz…

    Ah yes! The chili dip! They have there own special dip – I just remember, now that you mentioned it. Loved the one at another place.
    https://suituapui.wordpress.com/2013/11/29/just-one-day/
    Here, they just give the same one as the kolo mee I had in my previous post – not quite there, unfortunately.

  6. wah popiah lady so lansi LOL I am a huge fan of pan mee… and lam mee too ๐Ÿ˜€

    She was a nice, gentle lady…but not quite the kind that would go all out when they run a business, not so out-going or pro-active…or in other words, aggressive. I’m just so-so with pan mee or lam mee – both, I would not mind sometime for a change, if I happen to come across any, but not something that I would go out of my way to look for and to have.

  7. Nice pan mee you have there but I don’t like the cangkuk manis, piece by piece. Popiah looks good.

    They did tear the veg but not enough – I would like it in smaller bits too. As for the popiah, this was just ok – I think you have some better ones in Kuching…and the one that I used to love so much was as good or even better than any of the good ones in Kuching – she called hers Kuching popiah so that’s a compliment!

  8. Most of the places over here still uses hand mades the noodles e.g. Kin Kin but others use a pasta roller type machine (still manually crank it out).

    I’m not a huge fan myself but the better half likes it and I do like the cangkuk manis soup!

    Yeah come to think of it, it’s just a month till Christmas!

    Yes, Christmas will be here soon. Glad to see you back – I reckon that means you’re getting better. Take care there. I’m not really a fan of pan mee either but I do not mind having it once in a while for a change.

  9. I love soupy pan mee. Oh. I did not know it is originated from Hakka.

    I did not either…until I googled. Well, at least, we all know the origin now.

  10. The Pan Mee looks very different from what we have it here.

    It does. Hand-made ones more pale, if I’m not mistaken. Factory-made, perhaps but texture is similar…just like the instant ones that people have been sending me also, more or less.

  11. Pan Mee is Cantonese pronunciation lah.. Pan = board, not frying pan ๐Ÿ˜€ .. I think it is because originally, the noodle dough was rolled out into a flat piece on a board before cutting it into strips or pieces, hence the name..

    I don’t speak Cantonese – ignorance is bliss…but at least, with the info from wiki, I am a little bit wiser now. Hehehehehehe!!!!!

    1. It seems you are not too impressed with the popiah after all. I thought the filling is too watery to my liking..

      No, it’s just so-so, ok but not something I would want to go back for, that’s for sure.

  12. What a bummer! After all the waiting, the popiah did not turn out well for you. The skin does not look translucent enough and rather unappetising. Yes, the Christmas decorations at some malls are up already. I was at The Intermark over the weekend and it was all done up ๐Ÿ™‚

    Yes, so disappointing. Had my hopes up high. ๐Ÿ˜ฆ

  13. Wow the popiah does look very appetizing! I miss the Sister’s Popiah in KL, very crunchy.

    Sisters’? Never heard. Not too fond of Kl ones, the filling is different. There are some really good ones in Kuching, I know.

  14. Delicious pan mee and that’s my all time favorite. From the photos of yours, it really looks good and springy too.

    I enjoyed this one very much – one of the better ones I have had in town.

  15. Flat flour noodles look yummy! So is the popiah!

    The noodles were great., the popiah was…ok. I make nicer ones at home. Hehehehehe!!!

  16. For this pan mee, I always like to order the hand-torn one!! That’s because the way I eat is very childish all the time, I like to eat the “one” by “one”, so usually when I had that, I can eat very slow, hahaha!!!

    I had hand made and hand torn ones – the first pan mee stall we had in town long ago. Not too sure where I can find that here now as I don’t usually go for that. Will order sometimes for a change if I happen to see it around.

  17. I really love how the first dish looks. Pan mee? That’s new to me, I will have to search for a recipe and make it for my daughter.

    I’m not sure how they make it, the noodles. Perhaps this is the way:

  18. For some reason all of the green onions – they are calling me – I can’t say as tho I have ever craved Green Onions until now…lol…

    They add a special flavour to any dish – just sprinkle a little in some clear soup, they will bring the taste to a whole new level. Very fragrant.

  19. Ohh I miss those lovely popiah, I remember when I used to work in PJ I sometimes have them for a snack

    You worked in PJ before? Wowwwwww!!!! You’ve been all over the world. I’m impressed!

  20. I love pan mee and so do my mum. So far my mum said Sibu still cannot find a nice pan mee that she like. Every time when she come, she will have daily pan mee as breakfast. hahahha.

    She likes soup or dry. Dry one, this one is good or the coffee shop back to back with Sugar Bun, Delta Mall – Summer Corner. Soup one – the Penang prawn mee stall – coffee shop below Medan Hotel, Sibu bus terminal.

  21. When eating pan mee, I prefer the hand torn ones. And handmade dough, not those factory-made ones. There’s a difference in the texture. Usually I go for soup pan mee, with lots of anchovies but I don’t mind the dry version. But the dry version over here is darker in colour.

    I don’t really like the soup version – rather mild, quite bland. I prefer something stronger. Never paid much attention – as long as it is not hard or rubbery, ok by me. Haven’t had enough to tell the difference – not that many places selling it here…and Sibu is a VERY small town.

All opinions expressed in my blog are solely my own, that is my prerogative - you may or may not agree, that is yours. To each his/her own.

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