Not what I expected…

I was so happy when I saw this at the supermarket near my house…

Kway teow

Some people may beg to differ but I always prefer the thin, smooth and translucent kway teow in the peninsula or what they call hor fun to our local kway teow which is white and thick. I did manage to get a very nice packet of the dried ones in Sungai Petani once way back then but the second time around, the packet that I bought, a different brand, was a real disappointment. The one from Thailand that I bought quite sometime ago was quite nice…but I felt it was rather expensive and the seasonings that came with it was a bit too heavy on the msg.

This one is very easy to prepare. You just soak it in boiling water for around 5 minutes to soften it…

Softened

…and it is ready for use.

I decided to try frying it and these were the ingredients that I prepared…

Ingredients

– finely chopped garlic, thinly-sliced wine-infused lap cheong (Chinese sausages), chopped spring onions, some homemade pounded chili plus garlic…and two eggs.

I tossed the softened kway teow in soy sauce and seasoning first…

Tossed

…so that I would not have to worry about getting it all evenly mixed together when frying.

I browned the garlic in some oil and then I threw in the lap cheong…followed by a spoonful or two of the pounded chili before putting in the kway teow and then, the eggs. Finally, I sprinkled the chopped spring onions all over and after mixing it all together, I dished it out and served…

Fried kway teow 1

It was nice, this much I would say! Unfortunately, it was not what I had expected – the texture of the noodles was in no way like kway teow, be it ours or the ones in the peninsula. I would say it was more like hung ngang or the big type of mihun

Fried kway teow 2

…in which case, I might as well go and buy that instead. I think it only costs around RM2 something whereas this packet of dry kway teow was selling at over RM5.00…and if I’m not mistaken, a kilo of freshly-made kway teow at the wet market or the shops and supermarket is half that price or perhaps even a little less.

That was just half of the packet so the next day, I decided to cook the rest and be done with it. This time around, I tossed it in Bovril and added thinly sliced omelette and fresh chili, plus a sprinkling of chopped spring onions…

Bovril kway teow

This was nice too – like when I cooked noodles or mee sua this way…but of course, it was nothing like the real kway teow.

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