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Doin’ what she likes…

My daughter loves potatoes in any form, even those deep-fried French fries…but she prefers the chunkier ones though. Seeing how she enjoyed the mashed potatoes here, we let her take with her to her jungle school what the boss tapao-ed for us to take home and she finished all of that as well.

Well, I saw some potatoes lying around the house so I thought I could do something with those for her to enjoy when she came back for the weekend and also to bring back to eat sometime in the week ahead.

I boiled 2 eggs and mashed them with some cheddar cheese (4 slices), shredded…

Eggs & cheese

…and I also added a tomato, seeds removed and cut into fine bits…

Tomato

I peeled the potatoes, cut them into cubes and boiled till soft…

Potatoes

…and I mixed everything together…

Tossed

I used what was left of the coleslaw dressing that I found in the fridge and I added a bit of mustard which my missus had mixed with balsamic vinegar and a pinch of cinnamon…and I mixed that with what was in the bowl…

Add dressing...

I also sprinkled a bit of this…

...and spice

…that I got from my god-son/ex-student, Andrew, who was home not too long ago from Christchurch, New Zealand. I tried a bit and seeing that it tasted really good I added a little bit more and tossed the whole thing thoroughly before putting it in the fridge to chill…

Ready to chill

We had some for dinner that night…

STP's potato salad with egg & tomato

…and seeing that my girl enjoyed it, no prize for guessing where the other tub went to.

Standing tall…

I have a curry leaf plant growing in one corner of my garden…

Curry leaf plant 1
*Archive photo*

I have to keep pruning it regularly as it gets terribly overgrown. In fact, it is more a tree now than just a plant or shrub. What I do not like is how the branches keep growing through the fence into my neighbours’ garden. I keep telling them that they may just help themselves to the leaves as and when they need them but still, I don’t feel comfortable with the intrusion.

However, there were a few branches that I had a problem with. Once I took the meat cleaver from the kitchen and asked my gardener to help trim the plant and it came back totally out of shape. My missus bought a saw from the shop and it was not very good either – sawing one branch would wear me out completely and I would just give up in the end. Well, my friend, Philip, who is currently home from the US, gave me a made-in-Germany saw. He enjoys going into those old shops and would pick up stuff from the good ol’ days and he bought a few of the saws among a whole lot of other hidden treasures that he could find…and he gave me one of them. Thank you so much, Philip – that sure was a life saver!

The saw was so so good that without much effort, I was able to prune the whole tree…

Curry leaf plant 2

…leaving behind just one branch so we would have some curry leaves for our own use as and when needed. Don’t worry! The branches may be hard to cut but they are very flexible so I can just bend it down easily to get the leaves and once I let go, it will go back to its upright position once again. I think, from now on, I will let the branches that are higher up grow while I keep trimming the lower ones – the ones that would protrude into the neighbours’ yard.

And talking about curry, remember the made-in-Sibu instant noodles that I blogged about the other day? This is another flavour

Daddy Mee - curry flavour

…that is available – curry…but with the horrendous hot weather that we’re experiencing at the moment, I don’t really care for anything served in piping hot soup. That was why the other day, I decided to have it dry.

I think I blogged about it before but anyway, there are two sachets inside…

Mee Daddy curry - sachets

- one with the curry seasoning and the other with the chili oil. I emptied both onto a plate and added a teaspoon of onion oil – oil that I have used to fry some sliced shallots for extra fragrance. I only used half the packet of the seasoning though – if you use all of it, it will be too salty. You may keep the remaining half to season whatever you may be cooking in future – fried rice or something.

After boiling the noodles till soft, I drained away all the water and tossed them with the aforementioned ingredients…

Mee Daddy - curry

…and served them, garnished with some chopped spring onions.

I had an egg half-boiled/cooked the other day so this time, I decided to have it fried…

Old-school fried egg

…the old school way.

I love that golden fringe and the yolk runny like this…

Runny yolk

…and I’m sure many of you do too!

Desperately…

I have been hunting for some really good, super-lemak nasi lemak in town but so far, I have yet to come across one that meets my standard. That left me with no choice but to try and cook my own. These were the ingredients I used…

Nasi lemak ingredients

…a bit of ginger, bruised, one stalk of serai (lemon grass), bruised also at the end and several leaves of pandan, knotted.

After washing 2½ cups of rice thoroughly, I added a can of santan (coconut milk) but that was not enough for the amount of rice I was cooking so I added a bit of water…

Nasi lemak ready to cook

…and threw in the aforementioned ingredients plus a pinch of salt and left it to cook. I don’t know if it’s my around-25-year-old rice cooker that was the problem but I had to stir it regularly to prevent the rice from sticking to the bottom of the pot. That was all right and I managed to get it done in the end.

I did not bother to cook the sambal or the other condiments to go with it. Instead, I just served it with some leftover sambal nenas (pineapple) and acar (pickle) and I fried some fish as well plus some sambal belacan that I had in the fridge

Nasi lemak 1

Unfortunately, it failed to meet my expectations. No, it just was not lemak enough. In fact, it was more or less like all those than I can get outside, nothing more and nothing less….and like all those outside, with all those things that I had to go with it…

Nasi lemak 2

…it sure made a very nice meal. Now where did I go wrong? Was it because I used canned santan instead of the freshly-squeezed one…or was it because I diluted it with water? At this point in time, I really do not know but I think I will give it another shot soon and hopefully, it will work out…somehow.

Gosh!!! It is really so very hot around here these days and one thing that we would do to cool down (inside) in such weather would be to cook some let tao th’ng (green bean soup). I think they call it bubur kacang hijau (green bean porridge) in Malay, if I am not wrong. Usually when my missus cooks it, she will drain it and everybody would enjoy it as when chilled, it does make a very nice refreshing drink…but it is such a waste of the beans which would end up being thrown away. Well, that day, I decided to do something with them. I added some water, evaporated milk and several scoops of pandan-flavoured kaya/coconut jam (Glory Brand) and brought it to boil…

Let tao dessert

Hey!!! It tasted really great especially when served cold. I must say that I enjoyed it a lot…and rest assured that when I cook some let tao th’ng again, I would surely use the beans for this very nice dessert…and maybe I would add some sago pearls as well next time.

Moving on from there, I am glad that I finally managed to use up all the not-very-nice made-in-China noodles that I bought in Miri. This time around, I fried them with sambal belacan plus some tauhu pok (fried bean curd) and tomato wedges…and garnish with spring onions…

Belcan fried noodles

…and some kacang tumbuk like what they do with Thai pineapple fried rice. I thought it was really very nice and the best thing about it was that the belacan was able to drown out the not-very-pleasant smell of the noodles and with the flavours of everything added, it sure was something I would not mind having again.

Maybe I can do the same with the (very much cheaper) dried egg noodles that we can get around here. Wanna have some? Come, come! Come on over and I’ll have that ready in a jiffy! Hehehehehehe!!!!

Homegrown…

This is made in Sibu…

Sibu's own Daddy Mee

- Daddy Mee…and this is their mi goreng (fried noodles)…or instant noodles with the taste of fried noodles. My favourite has always been the one from Indonesia and I personally feel that when they broke away and Malaysia started making its own, the only thing that was near identical would be the wrapper or the packaging. It was almost the same but somehow, I did not think it was as good. That was exactly how I felt about this one when I tried it a long long time ago and that is why I have never bought it again and stuck steadfastly to its chicken or curry flavours – those two,  I would say, are pretty good.

Well, this came free with the pack of 5 (curry flavour) that I bought sometime ago and since I had that at hand, I thought I might as well give it another try. For a start, the wrapper now is certainly much nicer than what it looked like when it first hit the market way back then. There are four sachets inside the packet…

Daddy mi goreng sachets

- the onion oil, the conjoined sachet of the seasoning and the chili powder and another sachet of the soy sauce so what I did was to empty all of them onto a plate, cook the noodles and toss them altogether well before garnishing it with some fried shallots and chopped spring onions…

Daddy mee goreng - cooked

I have not had the others for a while now so I cannot say that I can make a fair comparison but I honestly thought that what I had that morning when I cooked this was pretty good, not bad at all.

This was free but if you were to buy a pack of 5 for around RM3.50, that would mean that this would cost only 70 sen. Of course, some of you may feel that this would not be substantial enough to get you through the morning so what you can easily do is to boil an egg the way you like it to go with the noodles. That morning, I chose to have one half-boiled/cooked…

With one half-boiled egg

…with the yolk still soft and runny and the white already hard. I love it this way with a dash of dark soy sauce…

...with soy sauce

…and that was enough to last me till lunch.

So, let’s say the egg is around 30 sen each, the whole breakfast will cost only RM1.00…or if you prefer some meat to go with it, you can fork out a ringgit for a few pieces of char siew perhaps. It sure beats eating in the shops where it is much more expensive on all counts and what you get may not necessarily be nicer at times. What do you think?

Back here again…

We went back here again for lunch sometime last week when Melissa was still home for the mid-year school holidays as she wanted to try the chao chai hung ngang

1-O-1 chao chai hung ngang

…that ah^kam_koko’ had earlier and we thought it was really good. For the uninitiated, this is actually the big bihun that is called hung ngang in Foochow served in fish (or chicken) soup cooked with chao chai (preserved vegetables) and a whole lot of ginger and whatever else and traditional Foochow red wine. They do it very well here – something like what we would cook ourselves at home, not some watered-own version of the soup.

Of course she could not finish the HUGE serving (RM10.00), maybe just half of it…and that is exactly why I feel they should serve it in smaller portions at half the price, or slightly more…like what my missus had – their Foochow style fried noodles, wet/with sauce…

1-O-1 Foochow fried noodles

The portion is just right for one person and of course, when you order something a lot cheaper, you will not get a lot of ingredients other than those few bits of green vegetables and one miserable piece of meat. This tasted really good too though…and I wouldn’t mind asking for that the next time around but perhaps, I will request for the special like the tomato kway teow (RM10.00)…

1-O-1 tomato kaway teow

…that I had.

I asked the guy what the special would include and he said seafood so I was somewhat disappointed that all I got was a few chunks of fish…or so I thought but as I was eating, I came across a few slices of liver..

Liver

- no, that’s not seafood but I love liver! Anything that is not good for me is always nice! As they say, forbidden fruit is sweeter, right or not? Hehehehehehe!!!!

Eventually, I came across a few prawns as well…

Prawns

…and that was about it. I was hoping there would be sotong (squid) as well but no, I did not find any.

On the whole, it tasted o.k. – I would prefer it with less cornflour starch so the sauce/gravy isn’t so thick but on the whole, it was all right. The serving was big too, almost as big as the chao chai hung ngang but I was able to manage quite well – for me, it was not a problem at all.

We didn’t cook lunch at home that day but for dinner, we had this roasted chicken thigh with baby potatoes…

Roast chicken & baby potatoes

…and Melissa tried to replicate the creamy spinach pasta

Melissa's creamy spinach pasta

…that we had several days before. I am not sure if they were the same or not – I can’t exactly recall what the other one tasted like, just that it was nice…and this one was nice too…but there was a lot of the spinach sauce so we just drowned the spaghetti with it instead of letting it go to waste.

With the chicken and the potatoes, I would say that was indeed a delightful home-cooked dinner for the three of us…

Skin…

Melissa bought a pack of wanton skin from a supermarket here and last week, she used it to wrap the minced meat and chives filling to make some dumplings…

Melissa's dumplings 1

These certainly looked real dainty, don’t you think? I thought they resembled something like a sailor hat – Popeye’s…

Melissa's dumplings 2

They were steamed…and also boiled and served in clear soup…

Melissa's dumplings in clear soup

…and of course, we loved them a lot – very very nice.

She and the mum also made these…

Chai koi with wanton skin

…with the skin, something like what is called chai koi except that the skin was not as thick and firm (or tough as in the case of the not-so-well-made ones). For the filling, they cooked mangkuang/sengkuang with hay bee/udang kering (dried prawns) and of course, they were better than anything we can get outside where they will usually scrimp on the ingredients…and the saddest part, of course, would be the fact that they do not come cheap these days, not anymore.

There were some dumplings left over so the next day, I decided to cook the Japanese ramen that I got from Twilight Man

Ramen 1

He bought that in Japan and the sweet guy sent me a box to try.

There were three servings inside…

Ramen 2

- three packets of noodles, three sachets of seasoning for the soup and pickled ginger and chili sauce, both three each as well.

I cooked them and also the soup and served that with the aforementioned dumplings, a couple slices of luncheon meat and one hard-boiled egg…

Ramen 3

…per bowl. Yes, yes…the egg was overcooked and I suspect that had got to do with the eggs these days. The shell is so thin one can just press it in between the thumb and finger and break it – no need to crack at all…and even the yolk has a different shade of yellow, I wonder why! Normally, if I boil the eggs for 5 minutes, the yolk would be runny – something like half-boiled egg yolk with hard-boiled egg white. This egg was boiled for 7-8 minutes but looking at how it turned out, I guessed I should have reduced the cooking time to just 5 minutes.

The noodles were great…

Ramen 4

- nice texture, firm and not soggy and the soup was very tasty. We sure enjoyed that a lot! Thank you once again, Twilight Man, for sending that to me. Any more at home? I certainly wouldn’t mind some more of that coming my way. Dijamin sampai hari esok! Muahahahahahaha!!!!!

I also got these made-in-Shah Alam tomato nutri flat noodles (pan mee)…

Tomato noodles 1

…from King Hua and I decided I could cook those as well and serve it with the dumpling soup…

Tomato noodles 2

It turned out very nice as well and if anyone is wondering, no, the noodles did not taste any different from the normal ones, no trace of the tomato…or at least, none that I could detect. I would say that they are something like mee pok, maybe a little bit thicker (and broader) and firmer and perhaps a little bit nicer. Thank you so much to you too, King Hua.

Gosh!!! Imagine just one little pack of the skin and we ended with so many dumplings and oodles of noodles! I think we had had enough of those for quite a while now…

Whip it up…

My missus makes very very nice pancakes…and so do my family members who all got the recipe from her and now, Melissa has inherited the ability to do the same as well. She made some earlier and we gave a few pieces to her grandparents and the grandpa loved it so much so by special request, she made some more…

Melissa's pancakes

I never bothered to watch, much less learn how to make them myself – I just ate! Hehehehehe!!!! However, the other day, I made it a point to see how it was done.

First, whip the butter with the sugar…

Butter + sugar

- a quarter can or half a block of butter and 3 tablespoons of sugar. Use Golden Churn, no less, or any other brand that you like, not the much cheaper sapuan istemewa dengan lemak susu and between the two, I find the canned ones a lot nicer than those frozen hard ones sold in bricks.

Next, add 3 eggs…

Eggs

…and whip it altogether well before adding 2 cups of flour…

Flour

You may do it one cup at a time while mixing the evaporated milk & water – three-quarter cup of the milk and one-quarter water bit by bit while whisking/whipping continuously till the batter is smooth…

Milk & water

…and of the right consistency. It should be something like cake batter – not too watery…and not too thick either. If it is too thick, you may add a bit more of the milk-butter combination.

Now, here’s the secret! Add 3 teaspoons of ENO…

ENO

…to the batter. Probably, its effervescent effect would give the pancakes the very much desired fluffiness, I wouldn’t know…but this seems to be the case.

Heat up a pan and grease it lightly with butter and then spoon the batter onto the pan…

Cooking the pancakes

…and let it cook on low neat till golden in colour – you will have to flip the pieces over to get that on both sides…

Melissa's pancake 1

Unfortunately, because of the irregular amount of batter in each scoop, the pancakes came in varying shapes and sizes. Perhaps, I should go and get one of those mini non-stick pans specially for pancakes or maybe the small ones for eggs but unless one has a few of those, one would need to cook them one by one and that may be rather tedious and time-consuming.

Ah well! I guess it does not really matter as this is solely for one’s own home consumption and it will all end up in the same place, anyway so what matters most is that all the pancakes are very soft and fluffy…

Melissa's pancake 2

…and absolutely yummy…even on its own, without the syrup or honey or anything.

Want some? Nom…nom…nom!!! LOL!!!

Let’s roll…

Somebody commented in my post the other day asking me where we could buy freshly-made popiah skin here in Sibu. Well, I got mine from one of the tofu stalls at the Sibu Central Market but one would have to place an order and then go back there the next day to collect.

I ordered 2 kilos and used up one the first time around when I made some for the Duānwǔ or Dragon Boat Festival and as I had another kilo left, I decided to make some more and use up all of it. It did seem that after being kept in the fridge, the skin became a little hard and was not as nice.

Actually, I have blogged about making popiah before sometime ago here and here but anyway, this second time around, I fried some finely-chopped garlic in a bit of oil…

Garlic

…and once it has turned brown, that would be the time to add the minced meat or prawns or crab meat that one is using. I was thinking of having some kind of semi-vegetarian popiah that day so I did not include any of those. That was why the thinly-sliced long beans went in next…

Long beans

The previous occasion, I used French beans so I thought we could do with a little bit of change.

After frying that for a while till I felt the long beans were already quite cooked, I added the sliced tau kua (bean curd cake)…

Tau kua

…and mixed them altogether well.

I did the same with the mangkuang/sengkuang (turnip), peeled and finely grated…

Mangkuang

…and for the seasoning, I used one ikan bilis (dried anchovies) stock cube and a few dashes of fish sauce…but one might choose to just use salt and msg instead.

Lastly, I threw in some chopped spring onions…

Spring onions

…for that extra bit of fragrance and taste and once the filling was done…

Popiah filling

…it would be time to start rolling. Of course, you may do so if you want to add some thin strips of carrot and whatever else for that extra colour – that is all up to you. I also used to add taugeh (bean sprouts) but you cannot cook that for too long so that it would still be sweet and crunchy…and there lies the problem. Sometimes, the filling may spoil because of the taugeh so these days, I would just leave it out completely.

There would be a lot of gravy/sauce that had come out of the ingredients in the process of cooking so I tilted the wok to let it all drain to one side so that I could scoop it all up and get rid of it. The filling is best used quite dry so that the skin would not tear or be spoilt.

Not in any particular order, one would have to apply a layer of the blended chilli or chilli sauce, add the filling and the thinly sliced omelette that one would need to prepare before hand and sprinkle crushed peanut generously over it all (I just used the sweet kacang tumbuk cakes from the shops), add a bit of lettuce…and apply some of the “glue” made from caramelised sugar and cornstarch (also prepared earlier)…

Ready to roll

…and fold in the sides and roll it up!

Having done all that, then finally, it would be time to…EAT! LOL!!!

All through the day…

You may recall from an earlier post that I bought these made-in-China instant noodles

Made-in-China noodles

…when I was in Miri and they did not taste all that great, not at all. I would have thrown them all away had they not been so expensive so I decided to get rid of the seasonings and just use the noodles.

I tried tossing them with onion oil, Bovril, chopped spring onions and fried shallots…

Made-in-China noodles with Bovril

…and I had them served with some slices of roast duck that I had in the fridge but no, I did not think it was all that great as I could still detect the smell of the noodles and that did not tickle my fancy. It would be much nicer with our own local-made mee sua or dried noodles.

So, on another morning, I decided to fry some…

Made-in-China noodles, fried

…for breakfast with some fresh shitake mushrooms and egg with a little bit of green vegetables thrown in. It sure tasted a whole lot nicer, fried…so I guess I could do the same with those in the packets that I still have left.

Moving on from the noodles, I also mentioned in my post a few days ago that my in-laws were in town for the long Gawai Dayak/Duānwǔ or Dragon Boat Festivals weekend. My brother-in-law brought a whole lot of stuff from Bintulu – fish, cincaluk (fermented shrimps), belacan (dried prawn paste) and even a bag of lemons, probably from his garden. My sister-in-law from Kuching brought some nice steamed paos (buns) and sio bee (meat dumplings) and some salted fish-meat patties that she made herself and also some belacan though she kept insisting that hers would not be as nice as the ones my brother-in-law brought from Bintulu. I wouldn’t know for sure at this point in time as I have not tried it yet.

However, the other day, I did take three slices of the big ikan tengirri (mackerel) that my brother-in-law gave us and deep-fried them for lunch…

Lunch

…with some cincaluk dip to go with it and I boiled some ladies’ fingers to eat ulam-style with sambal belacan plus we also had the sio bee and the salted-fish patties from my sister-in-law. That certainly was a delightful lunch and we enjoyed everything so much that we finished it all in one sitting. That was why I had to cook something else for dinner that day…

Dinner

…and for that, I opened a can of luncheon meat and fried that with egg and sliced Bombay onions. This is a brand that I saw on the shelf in one of the supermarkets here – Porkies, a product of Denmark and it claims to contain 85% meat. True enough, it wasn’t as soft and wobbly as some of the other brands, probably due to their high fat content and it tasted really great. At over RM8.00 a tin, I certainly would buy that the next time around should I feel like having luncheon meat again – there are others (like SPAM, for instance) that are a whole lot more expensive.

To go with the meat, I cooked the pumpkin that I had seen sitting in the fridge for quite a while now and as I was feeling lazy (which would be the case most of the time, I have to confess), I decided not to go through all the chopping and pounding to get the sambal hay bee (dried prawn paste) ready to fry that with. Instead, I just used this packet of masak merah ingredients along with one chopped shallot and a couple of the skinny serai (lemon grass) that I have growing in a  pot outside my house. Ooooo…I thought it tasted really good and it was so delightfully spicy but my girl did not really like it as she felt that it drowned out the taste of the pumpkin that she liked a lot.

And talking about my girl, she made this fritata for lunch a day or two later…

Melissa's fritata 1

…and being the jakun that I am, I did not even know how to spell the name. Blush! Blush!

Of course, it was very nice – it couldn’t possibly be otherwise with all that ham and cheese that went into it…

Melissa's fritata

…and if anyone is interested in making that as well, here’s her recipe:
Broccoli Fritata
Ingredients
6 eggs
1 head of broccoli
6 slices of sandwich ham
half slab of cheddar cheese
a pinch of salt
2 dashes of pepper
1 tbs of olive margarine spread
*The original recipe calls for 12 eggs and uses bacon. I’m trying to be more health conscious. Haha.
*The type of meat and cheese you mix into the egg mixture in optional.
You could also add in tomatoes, mushrooms or fresh peas or whatever tickles your fancy.

Steps
1. Wash the head of broccoli thoroughly first. Then, slice it into smaller pieces.
2. Slice the sandwich ham into thin strips.
3. Grate the half slab of cheddar cheese.
4. Crack the eggs into a bowl. Put in salt, pepper, and the grated cheddar. Whisk everything up.
5. Heat up the frying pan and put a dollop of olive margarine spread. When it starts sizzling, add in the ham.
Stir it around until the ham has slightly browned.
6. Add in the egg mixture. Shake the pan around to make sure its surface is evenly coated. Then, add the broccoli.
7. Turn the heat down to let the egg mixture cook thoroughly. Meanwhile, heat the oven up to 180 deg cel.
8. When the oven’s hot enough, put the frying pan in. It’s ready when it’s all fluffed up with a golden brown surface.

Enjoy!

Obviously, you will need a pan with a detachable handle if you were to put that in the oven. Luckily, we have a pan in the house – the handle has come off but we still use it as it seems to be a whole lot better than all the newer pans we have, just like my old and faithful, no-longer-round wok that I use all the time in my cooking posts. Hmmm…that sure goes to show that the older you are, the better you get, right? Guess the same thing applies when it comes to people as well, doesn’t it? Hehehehehehe!!!!

The best thing…

…in life is free or in the exact words of the age-old English saying, the best things in life are free and I got this…

Ikan Brand chicken curry paste

…free from my cousin in Melbourne. Nope, she did not send this all the way from Australia. Actually, she was visiting her in-laws and was in Singapore and Johore and she got it from there and sent it over. All this while, we would use the A1 Mountain Globe brand despite people telling me that other brands are good too…and since I had this at hand, I decided to give it a try the other day.

First, I fried the finely-chopped Bombay onion and shallots in just a little bit of oil…

Bombay onion & shallots

…till golden brown. I think many would use a lot more but in my case, I felt that just a little bit would suffice as there would be oil in the paste as well and some more from the chicken so if I had used a lot, it would be too oily…like some of those curries you see at the stalls and shops – swimming in the oil.

Next, I threw in the serai (lemon grass), bruised – two stalks of it as my potted ones are kind of skinny…and a sprig of curry leaves, removed from the stalk…

Serai & curry leaves

The curry paste should go in next but I did not want that as it would send the oil spluttering all over my cooker top. My missus thinks that I am such a fussy and cranky old man because when I’m cooking in the kitchen, while cooking, I would wash and put away the things I have used and make sure the surfaces are spotless. That was why I put in the chicken first – do make sure the meat is dry, not dripping wet, before the paste went in…

Meat & paste

I mixed everything together and fried for a while before covering the wok with its lid and let the meat cook and the juices flow out.

After that, I added water, enough to submerge all the meat and brought it back to boil before putting in the potatoes…

Potatoes

I waited till it had resumed boiling and both the meat and potatoes were cooked enough before adding another sprig of curry leaves (also removed from the stalk) and a can of evaporated milk…

Milk

Yes, you read correctly – I said evaporated milk all right. I was at a relative’s Raya open house and I really loved the curry – it was thick and very rich and quite different from the usual so I asked and I was told that they used evaporated milk instead of santan (coconut milk). Besides, in our hot and humid tropical weather, the santan in the curry would cause it to go bad easily so I would think evaporated milk would be a better, less worrisome option for us here.

Just bring that back to boil once again and after letting it simmer for a while, it was ready to be served…

Chicken  curry

There! What do you think of it?

It tasted great – very nice though I still think the A1 Mountain Globe has a slight edge over it but I would consider using it in the event of the other one being not available.

For our vegetable dish to go with this, I fried a plate of cangkuk manis

Fried cangkuk manis

…again! My missus bought two ikats (bundles) that day when we saw it at the kampung stall at Bandong, you see. She said it was so cheap as in the town at the market, it would be double that price. However, this time around, I added a handful of ikan bilis – so that would bring the taste to a whole new level. There are so many ways to cook this vegetable and one way would be as good as any other.

So, what have you been cooking lately? Anything to share?